Thursday, March 27, 2014

How does the weather affect your asthma?

Spring is in the air and the change in the weather is a nice relief from the long winter. However, for children who have asthma, especially if they are physically active, it can be a challenging time of year. Fluctuations in the weather at this time of year can trigger an asthma attack. Being aware of this fact can help minimize the impact.

According to the Asthma Society of Canada, nearly 3 million Canadians live with asthma. There are many different triggers that can bring on your asthma which differ from person to person. Some common triggers are:
Knowing what triggers your asthma is a good way to avoid and minimize the possibility of an attack.

As the weather conditions change an asthma attack can be triggered by:
  1. Cold air – If cold air is one of your triggers try breathing through your nose. Your nose is designed to warm and humidify air. Wear a scarf covering your mouth and nose and avoid exercising in extremely cold weather. 
  2. Wind and rain – Wet weather encourages the growth of mold. The wind blows mold and pollen through the air. Limit your outdoor exposure. 
  3. Heat and humidity – Hot days increase the ozone from smog, exhaust fumes and pollutants, that can trigger asthma attack. Humidity, which creates a lot of moisture in the air, can also trigger an attack. On such days stay inside where there is an air-conditioner and good quality air. 
Though you cannot control the weather, understanding what weather triggers may cause your asthma can help you lessen the possibility of an attack. Monitoring the weather forecast and signing up for weather updates can help you manage and stay on top of the circumstances which may pre-empt an attack.

References Available from the SIRC Collection:


1. Butcher J. Exercise-induced Asthma in the Competitive Cold Weather Athlete. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). December 2006;5(6):284-288.
2. Carey B, Chen I. Tomorrow's weather: Thunder and asthma. Health (Time Inc. Health). July 1996;10(4):23.
3. Carlsen K, Hem E, Stensrud T. Asthma in adolescent athletes. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. December 15, 2011;45(16):1266-1271.
4. Laitano O, Martins J, Mattiello R, Perrone C, Fischer G, Meyer F. Sweat Electrolyte Loss in Asthmatic Children During Exercise in the Heat. Pediatric Exercise Science. May 2008;20(2):121-128.
5. McGrew C. NCAA Football and Conditioning Drills. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). July 2010;9(4):185-186.
6. Ueda K, Nitta H, Odajima H. The effects of weather, air pollutants, and Asian dust on hospitalization for asthma in Fukuoka. Environmental Health & Preventive Medicine. November 2010;15(6):350-357.

Dans quelle mesure la température a-t-elle une incidence sur l’asthme?

Le printemps est à nos portes, et un changement de température est plus que bienvenu après un dur hiver. Cependant, cette période de l’année peut être difficile pour les enfants souffrant d’asthme, particulièrement s’ils sont actifs physiquement. En effet, les variations de température à ce temps-ci de l’année peuvent entraîner une crise d’asthme. Néanmoins, les conséquences peuvent être atténuées si on connaît tous les faits.


Selon la Société canadienne de l’asthme, près de trois millions de Canadiens souffrent d’asthme. Il existe de nombreux facteurs qui causent ce trouble respiratoire, et ceux-ci varient d’une personne à l’autre. En voici quelques-uns :
Connaître les causes de l’asthme est une bonne façon d’éviter une crise et de réduire le nombre de cas. Au fur et à mesure que les conditions météorologiques changent, les facteurs ci-dessous peuvent entraîner une crise d’asthme.
  • Air froid* – Si vous êtes vulnérable à l’air froid, essayez de respirer par le nez, car il permet de réchauffer et d’humidifier l’air. Portez un foulard pour couvrir votre bouche et votre nez, et évitez de faire de l’exercice dans des températures extrêmement froides. 
  • Vent et pluie* – Les temps de pluie favorisent la création de moisissure, et le vent souffle la moisissure et le pollen dans l’air. Limitez alors votre exposition à l’air extérieur. 
  • Chaleur et humidité – Les journées chaudes augmentent l’ozone en raison du smog, en plus d’évacuer des vapeurs et des polluants, qui peuvent causer une crise d’asthme. L’humidité, qui crée beaucoup de vapeur d’eau dans l’air, peut aussi être un déclencheur. Donc lors de journées chaudes, restez à l’intérieur, dans un endroit climatisé et offrant une bonne qualité d’air. 
Même si on ne peut contrôler la température, comprendre les facteurs météorologiques qui peuvent causer l’asthme peut réduire les possibilités de crise. Surveiller les prévisions météo et recevoir des mises à jour peut vous aider à planifier vos journées et à rester à l’affût des circonstances qui peuvent entraîner une crise.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Butcher J. Exercise-induced Asthma in the Competitive Cold Weather Athlete. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). December 2006;5(6):284-288.
2. Carey B, Chen I. Tomorrow's weather: Thunder and asthma. Health (Time Inc. Health). July 1996;10(4):23.
3. Carlsen K, Hem E, Stensrud T. Asthma in adolescent athletes. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. December 15, 2011;45(16):1266-1271.
4. Laitano O, Martins J, Mattiello R, Perrone C, Fischer G, Meyer F. Sweat Electrolyte Loss in Asthmatic Children During Exercise in the Heat. Pediatric Exercise Science. May 2008;20(2):121-128.
5. McGrew C. NCAA Football and Conditioning Drills. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). July 2010;9(4):185-186.
6. Ueda K, Nitta H, Odajima H. The effects of weather, air pollutants, and Asian dust on hospitalization for asthma in Fukuoka. Environmental Health & Preventive Medicine. November 2010;15(6):350-357.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

These Paws Were Made for Walking

Owning a pet can offer you more than just adorable pictures to post to your Facebook or Instagram accounts. The benefits of having a four-legged companion range from being less stressed, to increased physical activity, and even a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Companion animals have been used in various therapies for years to help raise spirits and be a calming presence. Now post-secondary institutions and offices are getting in on the action. Rising in popularity in the last couple of years, universities and colleges have been bringing in therapy dogs to ease exam stress for students, while workplaces are allowing employees to bring their canines to work.

Now imagine the feel-good benefits you can expect if you combine your pet’s unconditional love with the effects of increased physical activity. For dog owners, many cite fido as the reason for getting in at least a daily walk, if not for them, for the responsibility to their pet. Using your dog as a workout partner can be a fun motivational tool for those who might be experiencing a bit of a lull in their training.

Tips to Keep You and Your Dog Happy
  • Take training gradually. As an athlete you would never begin training by pushing yourself to extremes, the same applies for your four-legged friend. Work in increments toward completing full distance runs or bikes.
  • Stay hydrated. Drinking enough water during and after training is just as important for your dog’s performance and health as it is yours.
  • Know the limit. You know your body best and when you've hit your physical limits. Running with your dog means you have to keep an eye on them as well, if they begin to pant heavily or seek shade, it’s time for a break. 
Running and biking don’t have to be your only options for working out with your dog, walking is an option, as well as hiking, or turning a game of fetch in to intervals as you sprint behind your dog. Keep in mind that not all dog breeds are suited to rigorous activity, so do some research first. No matter how you and your dog plan on fitting physical activity into your lives, it will be time well spent for you and your pet.

References Available from SIRC Collection:

1. Cutt H, Giles-Corti B, Knuiman M, Timperio A, Bull F. Understanding Dog Owners' Increased Levels of Physical Activity: Results From RESIDE. American Journal Of Public Health. January 2008;98(1):66-69. 
2. Giaquinto S, Valentini F. Is there a scientific basis for pet therapy?. Disability & Rehabilitation. March 31, 2009;31(7):595-598. 
3. Lentino C, Visek A, McDonnell K, DiPietro L. Dog Walking Is Associated With a Favorable Risk Profile Independent of a Moderate to High Volume of Physical Activity. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2012;9(3):414-420. 
4. Oka K, Shibata A. Dog Ownership and Health-Related Physical Activity Among Japanese Adults. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. July 2009;6(4):412-418. 
5.  Owen C, Nightingale C, Whincup P, et al. Family Dog Ownership and Levels of Physical Activity in Childhood: Findings From the Child Heart and Health Study in England. American Journal Of Public Health. September 2010;100(9):1669-1671. 
6. Yabroff K, Troiano R, Berrigan D. Walking the Dog: Is Pet Ownership Associated With Physical Activity in California?. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2008;5(2):216-228.

Courir avec Fido

Avoir un animal vous offre bien plus que de belles photos à publier sur vos comptes Facebook ou Instagram. Les avantages d’avoir un compagnon à quatre pattes sont nombreux : les animaux peuvent réduire votre stress, accroître votre activité physique* et même de réduire les risques de maladies cardiovasculaires*.

Depuis des années, les animaux de compagnie* sont utilisés dans le cadre de diverses thérapies, entre autres pour remonter le moral et calmer les gens. Cette pratique est mise en application de plus en plus souvent dans des institutions postsecondaires et des lieux de travail. En effet, les universités et les collèges utilisent des chiens thérapeutiques pour diminuer le stress des étudiants lors d’examens, tandis que d’autres milieux de travail permettent aux employés d’amener leur chien avec eux.

Imaginez maintenant les bienfaits auxquels on peut s’attendre en combinant l’amour inconditionnel d’un animal et les effets d’une activité physique accrue. De nombreux propriétaires de chiens mentionnent que ces derniers sont la principale raison de prendre au moins une marche par jour, notamment pour assumer leurs responsabilités envers leur animal. Utiliser son chien comme partenaire d’entraînement peut être une motivation amusante pour les personnes qui connaissent un léger ralentissement dans leur entraînement.

Conseils pour assurer votre bonheur et celui de votre chien
  • Entraînez-vous progressivement. En tant qu’athlète, vous ne commenceriez jamais un entraînement en poussant vos limites. Le même principe s’applique lorsque vous faites de l’exercice avec votre animal. Augmentez graduellement la distance de vos marches ou de vos promenades à vélo. 
  • Ne négligez pas l'hydratation*. Boire suffisamment d’eau pendant et après l’entraînement est aussi important pour la performance et la santé de votre chien que pour les vôtres.  
  • Connaissez les limites. Vous connaissez votre corps mieux que quiconque et vous savez lorsque vous avez atteint vos limites. Courir avec votre chien implique que vous devez aussi garder un œil sur votre animal. Si ce dernier commence à haleter considérablement ou s’il cherche à aller à l’ombre, il est temps de prendre une pause.
La course et le vélo ne sont pas vos seules options pour vous entraîner avec votre chien. La marche est aussi une possibilité, de même que les randonnées et les jeux de « rapporter un jouet » par intervalles*, en sprintant avec votre chien. N’oubliez pas que certaines races de chiens ne sont pas adaptées aux activités physiques intenses, alors faites des recherches au préalable. Peu importe comment vous planifiez d’intégrer de l’activité physique dans votre vie et dans celle de votre chien, il est certain que vous passerez tous les deux du temps de qualité.
* Seulement disponible en anglais
Références de la collection de SIRC:
  
1. Cutt H, Giles-Corti B, Knuiman M, Timperio A, Bull F. Understanding Dog Owners' Increased Levels of Physical Activity: Results From RESIDE. American Journal Of Public Health. January 2008;98(1):66-69. 
2. Giaquinto S, Valentini F. Is there a scientific basis for pet therapy?. Disability & Rehabilitation. March 31, 2009;31(7):595-598. 
3. Lentino C, Visek A, McDonnell K, DiPietro L. Dog Walking Is Associated With a Favorable Risk Profile Independent of a Moderate to High Volume of Physical Activity. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2012;9(3):414-420. 
4. Oka K, Shibata A. Dog Ownership and Health-Related Physical Activity Among Japanese Adults. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. July 2009;6(4):412-418. 
5.  Owen C, Nightingale C, Whincup P, et al. Family Dog Ownership and Levels of Physical Activity in Childhood: Findings From the Child Heart and Health Study in England. American Journal Of Public Health. September 2010;100(9):1669-1671. 
6. Yabroff K, Troiano R, Berrigan D. Walking the Dog: Is Pet Ownership Associated With Physical Activity in California?. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2008;5(2):216-228.

Friday, March 21, 2014

Nutrition and Performance - SIRC newsletter

From training and competition to recovery plans, proper nutrition is important for both competitive and recreational athletes alike. Consuming a well-balanced diet enables your body to adjust to training, fuels your muscles for competition and ultimately helps you obtain optimal performance. With all the nutrition recommendations available online today, it can be difficult to separate the good information from the bad. That is why SIRC has compiled articles on caffeine and its effects on the body, advice on what to eat and when, recommendations for carbohydrate, fat and protein intake and some common nutrition beliefs you may be surprised to find aren't true.

For more information: http://www.sirc.ca/newsletters/mid-mar14/index.html

Nutrition et performance - Bulletin du SIRC

Qu’il s’agisse d’un entraînement, d’une compétition ou d’une activité prévue par un plan de récupération, il est important que les athlètes compétitifs et occasionnels aient une saine alimentation. Un régime bien équilibré permet à votre corps de s’adapter à l’entraînement, d’alimenter vos muscles pour la compétition et, au bout du compte, de vous aider à livrer une performance optimale. Comme on retrouve beaucoup de recommandations nutritives en ligne de nos jours, il peut être difficile de distinguer les bons renseignements des mauvais. SIRC a donc regroupé des articles contenant de l’information sur la caféine et ses effets sur le corps, des conseils sur l’alimentation (quoi et quand manger), des recommandations au sujet de la consommation de glucides, de lipides et de protéines, ainsi que des renseignements sur de fausses croyances populaires sur l’alimentation qui pourraient vous surprendre.

et plus encore: http://www.sirc.ca/newsletters/mid-mar14/index_f.html

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Goodbye Sochi!

As the flame went out at the Sochi 2014 Paralympic Winter Games, Canada stood third on the medal table. We accumulated 16 medals in total (7 Gold, 2 Silver and 7 Bronze). These games, exemplified by the slogan #WHATSTHERE, truly showed that the impossible can be possible.

There were great moments that made these games memorable. Brian McKeever falling in the 1km visually impaired cross-country race and recovering to win gold is a memory that stands out. McKeever left these games with a total of 3 gold medals, making his Paralympic career total 10. The wheelchair curling team came through once again as they cemented Canada as the best curling nation, maintaining Canada’s place as the only country to ever grace the top of the Paralympic podium in the event. We also witnessed 16 years old Mac Marcoux, the youngest member on the Paralympic team, bring home a gold and 2 bronze medals in alpine skiing. Showing the future is bright.

The 2014 Sochi Games were the largest Winter Paralympic Games in history with 700 athletes and 45 countries taking part. For 9 days the games showcased some of the best athletes in:
In 2018, the XXIII Olympic and XII Paralympic Winter Games will be hosted in Pyeongchang, South Korea from February 9th to 25th and March 9th to the 18th respectively. In two years Rio de Janeiro will be host city for the 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Summer Games.

References Available from the SIRC Collection:


1. Blauwet C, Benjamin-Laing H, Stomphorst J, Van de Vliet P, Pit-Grosheide P, Willick S. Testing for boosting at the Paralympic games: policies, results and future directions. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. September 2013;47(13):832-837.
2. Craig J. Paralympic Evolution or Revolution?. Athletics. November 2012;:4-7.
3. Groth J. MEN on a MISSION. Sports 'N Spokes Magazine. March 2014;40(2):16-21.
4. Misener L, Darcy S, Legg D, Gilbert K. Beyond Olympic Legacy: Understanding Paralympic Legacy Through a Thematic Analysis. Journal Of Sport Management. July 2013;27(4):329-341.
5. Tweedy S, Vanlandewijck Y. International Paralympic Committee position stand—background and scientific principles of classification in Paralympic sport. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. April 2011;45(4):259-269.
6. Willick S, Webborn N, Schwellnus M, et al. The epidemiology of injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. British Journal Of Sports Medicine [serial online]. May 2013;47(7):426-432.

Au revoir, Sotchi!

Alors que la flamme s’éteignait aux Jeux paralympiques d’hiver 2014 de Sotchi, le Canada figurait au troisième rang du tableau des médailles, comptant un total de 16 médailles (7 or, 2 argent, 7 bronze). Ces Jeux, dont le slogan était #CEQUIESTLA, ont réellement prouvé que ce qui semble impossible est en fait possible.

Des moments grandioses ont rendu ces Jeux mémorables. La victoire de Brian McKeever*, qui a chuté lors de l’épreuve d’un kilomètre en cross-country, mais qui s’est repris et a remporté la médaille d’or, est un moment qui se démarque. Brian a gagné un total de trois médailles d’or, lui qui en compte maintenant 10 dans sa carrière paralympique. L’équipe de curling en fauteuil roulant a accompli le travail encore une fois, solidifiant la réputation du Canada en tant que meilleure nation de curling. Le Canada demeure le seul pays à avoir remporté l’or à chaque fois dans une épreuve des Jeux paralympiques. Nous avons également vu Mac Marcoux*, le plus jeune membre de l’équipe paralympique (16 ans), remporter une médaille d’or et deux de bronze en ski alpin. Son avenir est très prometteur.

Les Jeux de Sotchi 2014 ont été les plus grands Jeux paralympiques d’hiver de l’histoire, grâce à la participation de 700 athlètes et de 45 pays. Pendant neuf jours, les Jeux ont mis en vedette certains
des meilleurs athlètes en :
En 2018, les 23e Jeux olympiques et les 12e Jeux paralympiquesd’hiver auront lieu à Pyeongchang, en Corée du Sud, du 9 au 25 février et du 9 au 18 mars, respectivement. Et dans deux ans, Rio de Janeiro sera la ville hôte des Jeux olympiques et paralympiques d’été de 2016.

* Seulement disponible en anglais
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Blauwet C, Benjamin-Laing H, Stomphorst J, Van de Vliet P, Pit-Grosheide P, Willick S. Testing for boosting at the Paralympic games: policies, results and future directions. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. September 2013;47(13):832-837.
2. Craig J. Paralympic Evolution or Revolution?. Athletics. November 2012;:4-7.
3. Groth J. MEN on a MISSION. Sports 'N Spokes Magazine. March 2014;40(2):16-21.
4. Misener L, Darcy S, Legg D, Gilbert K. Beyond Olympic Legacy: Understanding Paralympic Legacy Through a Thematic Analysis. Journal Of Sport Management. July 2013;27(4):329-341.
5. Tweedy S, Vanlandewijck Y. International Paralympic Committee position stand—background and scientific principles of classification in Paralympic sport. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. April 2011;45(4):259-269.
6. Willick S, Webborn N, Schwellnus M, et al. The epidemiology of injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games. British Journal Of Sports Medicine [serial online]. May 2013;47(7):426-432.

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Getting Started. Female Coaches in Sport

If you take a look at the Canadian women involved in elite coaching today, any of them could easily be a role model for future women looking to make a difference through coaching. However the early stages of a female coach’s career are the most important to ensure continued participation, as concluded by Laval University professor Guylaine Demers. Her research has identified several common problems faced by novice female coaches including:
  • Feelings of Incompetence
  • Lack of Knowledge
  • Low Financial Support
  • Fear of making mistakes 
Successful women such as Carla Nicholls (National Event Group Coach, National Talent Development Coach at Athletics Canada), Dawn Smyth (Manager of Coach Education and Development at Basketball Canada), and Brenda Van Tighem (Athletics Coach at University of Calgary), all found a paths that helped them overcome these issues. All three of these coaches had a mentor in the early stages of their careers. Being paired alongside another coach allows female coaches to develop their skills in an active learning environment. This can provide career defining confidence and offers opportunities that may have otherwise gone unrecognized.

Available Coaching/Mentor Programs:

National Team Apprenticeship Program (NTAP) – The NTAP is the result of the Coaching Association of Canada partnering with national sport organizations in Canada. NTAP provides opportunities for women to work with national teams as they prepare for and compete in major international events, such as the Olympics.

Canada Games Apprenticeship Program – This program allows each province and territory to send two female coaches to the Canada Games as coaching apprentices, leading up to and throughout the Games. The aim is for female coaches to gain practical and integrated major national multi-sport games experience.

National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP) – Established in 1974, the program is designed to educate and produce quality coaches across Canada. Certification is available in a variety of sports at the community, competitive, or instructional levels.

To help attract and retain women to coaching, grants and scholarships are also available for those women looking to pursue careers in coaching. To date, approximately three million dollars has been distributed through NSO grants, professional development grants, and NCI Women in Coaching scholarships. These funds are meant to help female coaches start to develop their careers and for those already coaching to further their education.

For those women interested in getting involved in sport as a coach, a great starting point would be to take a look at the Coaching Association of Canada website. The CAC has a wide variety of information for new coaches. Checking out individual NSOs and PSOs will also provide more specific information on their coaching programs and the support they provide for female coaches.

References Available from SIRC Collection:

1. Croxon S. An overview of CAC's Women in Coaching program. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Spring2009 2009;16(1):28-29. 
2. Croxon S. Women coaches - untapped natural resources in the Canadian sport system. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Fall2009 2009;16(3):17-47. 
3. Machida M, Feltz D. Studying Career Advancement of Women Coaches: The Roles of Leader Self-Efficacy. International Journal Of Coaching Science. July 2013;7(2):53-71. 
4. Norman L. The Challenges Facing Women Coaches and the Contributions They Can Make to the Profession. International Journal Of Coaching Science. July 2013;7(2):3-23. 
5. North J. Using 'Coach Developers' to Facilitate Coach Learning and Development: Qualitative Evidence from the UK. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2010;5(2):239-256. 
6. Robertson S. Best Practices. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Summer2010 2010;17(2):12.

Commencer par le début : les entraîneuses dans le sport

Si vous jetez un œil aux Canadiennes qui jouent un rôle d’entraîneur élite aujourd’hui, vous constaterez facilement que chacune d’entre elles pourrait agir comme modèle pour les femmes qui souhaitent faire leur marque en tant qu’entraîneuses. Cependant, les premières étapes de la carrière d’une entraîneuse sont les plus importantes pour assurer une participation continue, tel que l’a conclu la professeure Guylaine Demers de l’Université Laval. Sa recherche a ciblé plusieurs problèmes courants rencontrés par les entraîneuses débutantes, dont :
  • le sentiment d’incompétence; 
  • le manque de connaissances; 
  • un faible soutien financier;
  • la peur de commettre des erreurs. 
Les femmes qui ont connu du succès, comme Carla Nicholls (entraîneuse nationale d’un groupe d’épreuves et entraîneuse nationale du développement de talents à Athlétisme Canada) Dawn Smyth (responsable de la formation des entraîneurs à Basketball Canada) et Brenda Van Tighem (entraîneuse d’athlétisme à l’Université de Calgary), ont toutes suivi des parcours qui les ont aidées à surmonter ces obstacles. De plus, ces trois entraîneuses avaient l’aide d’un mentor au début de leur carrière. Le jumelage avec un autre entraîneur permet aux entraîneuses de développer leurs compétences dans un environnement d’apprentissage actif. Cette initiative peut aussi solidifier leur confiance en carrière et leur offrir des occasions qui auraient pu autrement passer inaperçues.

Programmes d’entraîneurs et de mentors disponibles

Programme d'apprentissage de l'équipe nationale (PAEN) – Le PAEN découle d’une collaboration entre l’Association canadienne des entraîneurs et des organisations nationales du sport au Canada. Le Programme offre aux femmes des occasions de travailler avec des équipes nationales, à mesure qu’elles se préparent pour d’importantes épreuves internationales, comme les Jeux olympiques.

Programme d’apprentissage des Jeux du Canada – Ce programme permet à chaque province et territoire d’envoyer deux entraîneuses aux Jeux du Canada en tant qu’apprenti, et ce, tout au long des Jeux. Le but est de leur donner de l’expérience pratique et intégrée dans le cadre d’épreuves nationales multisports.

Programme national de certification des entraîneurs (PNCE) – Établi en 1974, le PNCE vise à former des entraîneurs de qualité au Canada. La certification est offerte pour divers sports et selon trois profils : communauté, compétition et instruction.

Afin d’attirer et de maintenir en poste des entraîneuses, des bourses et des subventions sont offertes aux femmes qui en font une carrière. À ce jour, environ trois millions de dollars ont été remis par l’entremise de subventions aux organismes nationaux de sport, de subventions pour le perfectionnement professionnel et de bourses d’études de l’INFE pour les entraîneuses. Ces fonds visent à aider les entraîneuses à commencer à développer leur carrière ou à perfectionner leurs aptitudes.

Les femmes qui souhaitent participer au sport en tant qu’entraîneuses peuvent commencer en consultant le site Web de l’Association canadienne des entraîneurs. Celle-ci offre une diversité d’information pour les nouveaux entraîneurs. Elles peuvent aussi communiquer avec les organismes nationaux et provinciaux de sport pour obtenir des renseignements précis sur des programmes d’entraîneurs et pour avoir tout le soutien nécessaire.

 * Seulement disponible en anglais
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Croxon S. An overview of CAC's Women in Coaching program. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Spring2009 2009;16(1):28-29. 
2. Croxon S. Women coaches - untapped natural resources in the Canadian sport system. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Fall2009 2009;16(3):17-47. 
3. Machida M, Feltz D. Studying Career Advancement of Women Coaches: The Roles of Leader Self-Efficacy. International Journal Of Coaching Science. July 2013;7(2):53-71. 
4. Norman L. The Challenges Facing Women Coaches and the Contributions They Can Make to the Profession. International Journal Of Coaching Science. July 2013;7(2):3-23. 
5. North J. Using 'Coach Developers' to Facilitate Coach Learning and Development: Qualitative Evidence from the UK. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2010;5(2):239-256. 
6. Robertson S. Best Practices. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Summer2010 2010;17(2):12.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Tyler McGregor - Sledge Hockey

Tyler McGregor was named to the Canadian sledge hockey team when he was only 18. He was also the youngest member of the squad when team Canada won gold at the 2013 World Championships. Even though Tyler is just at the beginning of his sledge hockey career, he is already raking in the hardware. On top of Team Canada’s 2013 World’s gold, there are another two gold medals in the mix, as well as a silver medal. Sochi 2014 will be Tyler’s Paralympic debut with Team Canada.

General Information:

Date of Birth: March 11, 1994

Birthplace: London, Ontario
Residence: Forest, Ontario
Height/Weight: 175 cm/ 73 kg
Coach: Mike Mondin
Twitter: @tgregs8
CPC: http://paralympic.ca/tyler-mcgregor
HC: http://stats.hockeycanada.ca/roster_players/4264743?subseason=145203
IPC: http://ipc.infostradasports.com/asp/lib/TheASP.asp?pageid=8937&sportid=565&personid=1152545

Tyler McGregor - Hockey sur luge

Tyler McGregor a été sélectionné dans l’équipe canadienne de hockey sur luge alors qu’il n’avait que 18 ans. Il était aussi l’un des plus jeunes membres de l’équipe, lorsque le Canada a remporté l’or aux Championnats du monde de 2013. Même si la carrière de hockey sur luge de Tyler ne fait que commencer, il a déjà récolté beaucoup de prix. En plus de la médaille d’or de l’Équipe Canada aux Championnats de 2013, Tyler compte deux autres médailles d’or et une médaille d’argent. Les Jeux Paralympiques de Sotchi 2014 seront les premiers de Tyler au sein de l’Équipe Canada.
 
Renseignements généraux:

Date de naissance : 11 mars 1994
Lieu de naissance : London (Ontario)
Résidence : Forest (Ontario)
Taille/poids : 175 cm/ 73 kg
Entraîneur : Mike Mondin
Twitter : @tgregs8
CPC : http://paralympic.ca/fr/tyler-mcgregor
HC : http://stats.hockeycanada.ca/roster_players/4264743?subseason=145203
IPC : http://ipc.infostradasports.com/asp/lib/TheASP.asp?pageid=8937&sportid=565&personid=1152545

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Improving your game

Is your short game in golf hindering your ability to close out games? Are your competitors dropping you on hills during races?  In any competition, an athlete wants to go in well prepared in order to be able to accomplish his or her goals. However, some of us neglect to identify and correct our weaknesses and during competition, they can factor into the outcome you are trying to attain.

If you want to achieve your goals, you need to identify your weaknesses to be able to succeed. Ignoring these gaps can leave you exposed, especially in a tight competition or when your opponent decides to exploit them.

How do you identify areas of improvement?
  • Performance Analysis – Keep track of data to identify your strengths and weaknesses. It is also a way to quantify your training and performances to better understand what you need to work on.
  • Coaching – Get a coach to help you identify and improve your game while maintaining the strong aspects. A coach can help improve your biomechanics, mental strength and the way you approach training and competition.
  • Training – Incorporate training sessions that will help you excel. You can get these ideas from a coach or from a more experienced athlete. 
Working on the weakest aspects of your game allows for better consistency. You want to be able to maintain the same level of intensity throughout the competition rather than simply relying on your strength. Your weaknesses not only effect your game but can also make enjoying it harder and improving these gaps allows you to be more efficient and improve your game.

References Available from the SIRC Collection:


1. Chard C, MacLean J, Faught B. Managing Athletic Department Touch Points: A Case Study of One Institution Using Importance-Performance Analysis. Journal Of Intercollegiate Sport. December 2013;6(2):196-212.
2. Doron J, Gaudreau P. A Point-by-Point Analysis of Performance in a Fencing Match: Psychological Processes Associated With Winning and Losing Streaks. Journal Of Sport & Exercise Psychology. February 2014;36(1):3-13.
3. KOSTIS P, MACKIN T. IDENTIFY YOUR WEAKNESS. Golf Magazine. October 2012;54(10):27.
4.Qing W. Structure and characteristics of effective coaching practice. Coaching Psychologist. June 2013;9(1):7-17.
5. Rutkowska K, Gierczuk D. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND THE SENSE OF EFFICIENCY OF COACHING AND INSTRUCTING IN WRESTLING: Emotional intelligence in wrestling. Polish Journal Of Sport & Tourism. March 2012;19(1):46-51.
6. Silviu Ş, Doina M. THE EFFICIENCY OF AQUATIC ACTIVITIES AND SWIMMING KINETIC PROPHYLAXIS PATTERNS AND PROCEDURES. / EFICIENŢA MODELELOR Şl MIJLOACELOR KINETOPROFILAXIEI ÎN ÎNOT Şl ACTIVITĂŢI ACVATICE. Gymnasium: Scientific Journal Of Education, Sports & Health. December 2012;13(2):113-127.

Améliorer votre jeu

Votre faible jeu au golf nuit-il à votre capacité de terminer des parties? Vos adversaires vous font-ils mordre la poussière en course? Dans toutes les compétitions, les athlètes veulent être bien préparés afin d’atteindre leurs objectifs. Cependant, certains négligent de repérer et de corriger leurs faiblesses, ce qui peut avoir une incidence sur le résultat escompté lors des compétitions.

Si vous voulez atteindre vos objectifs*, vous devez cibler vos faiblesses pour réussir. Ignorer vos lacunes peut vous rendre vulnérable, particulièrement lors d’une compétition serrée ou lorsque votre adversaire décide d’exploiter vos points faibles.

Comment cibler les aspects à améliorer?
  • Analyse de la performance* – Faites un suivi de vos résultats pour cibler vos forces et faiblesses. C’est aussi une façon de quantifier votre entraînement et vos performances, ce qui vous permettra de mieux comprendre les aspects sur lesquels vous devez travailler. 
  • Entraîneur – Faites appel à un entraîneur pour vous aider à cibler vos compétences et à optimiser votre jeu, tout en exploitant vos forces. Un entraîneur peut vous aider à améliorer les éléments biomécaniques, votre force mentale et votre approche à l’entraînement et à la compétition. 
  • Entraînement* – Intégrez à votre routine des séances d’entraînement qui vous aideront à exceller. Un entraîneur ou un athlète expérimenté peut vous aider à trouver des idées. 
Améliorer les aspects les plus faibles de votre jeu vous donnera une meilleure constance dans vos résultats. Vous devez être en mesure de garder la même intensité tout au long de la compétition, plutôt que de simplement miser sur vos forces. Non seulement vos faiblesses ont-elles une incidence sur votre jeu, mais elles peuvent aussi rendre l’expérience moins agréable. Combler vos lacunes vous rendra plus efficace et améliorera votre jeu.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Chard C, MacLean J, Faught B. Managing Athletic Department Touch Points: A Case Study of One Institution Using Importance-Performance Analysis. Journal Of Intercollegiate Sport. December 2013;6(2):196-212.
2. Doron J, Gaudreau P. A Point-by-Point Analysis of Performance in a Fencing Match: Psychological Processes Associated With Winning and Losing Streaks. Journal Of Sport & Exercise Psychology. February 2014;36(1):3-13.
3. KOSTIS P, MACKIN T. IDENTIFY YOUR WEAKNESS. Golf Magazine. October 2012;54(10):27.
4.Qing W. Structure and characteristics of effective coaching practice. Coaching Psychologist. June 2013;9(1):7-17.
5. Rutkowska K, Gierczuk D. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND THE SENSE OF EFFICIENCY OF COACHING AND INSTRUCTING IN WRESTLING: Emotional intelligence in wrestling. Polish Journal Of Sport & Tourism. March 2012;19(1):46-51.
6. Silviu Ş, Doina M. THE EFFICIENCY OF AQUATIC ACTIVITIES AND SWIMMING KINETIC PROPHYLAXIS PATTERNS AND PROCEDURES. / EFICIENŢA MODELELOR Şl MIJLOACELOR KINETOPROFILAXIEI ÎN ÎNOT Şl ACTIVITĂŢI ACVATICE. Gymnasium: Scientific Journal Of Education, Sports & Health. December 2012;13(2):113-127.

Dennis Thiessen - Wheelchair Curling

The Sochi 2014 Paralympics will be Dennis Thiessen’s first Games and it’s a dream come true for him. It was only after a two year tryout process that Dennis was named to Canada’s wheelchair curling team in 2012. In 2013, Thiessen was an integral part of Canada taking home gold in the World Wheelchair Curling Championships. Dennis sites Cindy Klassen as someone he uses as inspiration when representing and competing for Team Canada.

General Information:

Date of Birth: April 20, 1961
Birthplace: Crystal City, Manitoba
Residence: Sanford, Manitoba
Height/Weight: 160 cm/ 62 kg
Coach: Joe Rea
Twitter: @thiessen_dennis
CPC: http://paralympic.ca/dennis-thiessen

Dennis Thiessen - Curling en fauteuil roulant

Dennis Thiessen participera à ses cinquièmes Jeux Paralympiques lors des Jeux de Sotchi 2014, et c’est un rêve qui devient réalité pour lui. C’est après un processus d’essai de seulement deux ans que Dennis a été sélectionné dans l’équipe de curling en fauteuil roulant du Canada en 2012. En 2013, il a joué un rôle primordial dans la victoire du Canada, qui a remporté l’or aux Championnats du monde de curling en fauteuil roulant. Dennis cite Cindy Klassen comme une de ses inspirations pour représenter le Canada et participer aux Paralympiques.

Renseignements généraux:

Date de naissance : 20 avril 1961
Lieu de naissance : Crystal City (Manitoba)
Résidence : Sanford (Manitoba)
Taille/poids : 160 cm/62 kg
Entraîneur : Joe Rea
Twitter : @thiessen_dennis
CPC : http://paralympic.ca/fr/dennis-thiessen

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Margarita Gorbounova - Para-Nordic Skiing

Paralympians and para-nordic skiing are things that run in the family for Margarita Gorbounova. It was her parents, both of whom are visually impaired, that introduced Margarita to cross-country skiing. Her mother (a Para-Nordic skier) is a gold and silver medalist from the 1992 Albertville Paralympics, and her father (a middle distance runner) has a silver and gold medal from the European Championships. In addition to training for the Paralympics, Gorbounova is a graduate of the University of Ottawa where she studied translation and interpretation.

General Information:

Date of Birth: July 1, 1984
Birthplace: St. Petersburg, Russia
Residence: Ottawa, Ontario
Height/Weight: 163 cm/ 63 kg
Coach: Robin McKeever, Kaspar Wirz
Twitter: @MGourbounova
CPC: http://paralympic.ca/margarita-gorbounova
IPC: http://ipc.infostradasports.com/asp/lib/theasp.asp?pageid=8937&sportid=-567&personid=919292&refreshauto=1

Margarita Gorbounova - Ski para-nordique

Les athlètes paralympiques et le ski para-nordique font partie de la famille de Margarita Gorbounova. Ce sont ses parents, tous deux atteints d’une déficience visuelle, qui lui ont fait connaître le ski para-nordique. Sa mère, une skieuse para-nordique elle aussi, est une médaillée d’or et d’argent des Paralympiques d’Albertville de 1992. Son père, quant à lui, est un coureur de demi-fond qui a remporté des médailles d’or et d’argent aux Championnats d’Europe. En dehors du monde du sport, Margarita détient un diplôme en traduction et interprétation de l’Université d’Ottawa.

Renseignements généraux:

Date de naissance : 1er juillet 1984
Lieu de naissance : Saint-Pétersbourg (Russie)
Résidence : Ottawa (Ontario)
Taille/poids : 163 cm/63 kg
Entraîneurs : Robin McKeever et Kaspar Wirz
Twitter : @MGourbounova
CPC : www.paralympic.ca/fr/margarita-gorbounova
IPC : http://ipc.infostradasports.com/asp/lib/theasp.asp?pageid=8937&sportid=-567&personid=919292&refreshauto=1

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Getting the Job Done: Female Coaches in Sport

From the recreational level all the way up to high performance athletes, more girls and women are participating in sport than ever before. However, the number of female coaches seen on the playing field has not followed the same trend and it’s not for a lack of talent. Female coaches, or those with the potential, are an untapped resource in the sporting community.

Dawn Smyth and Carla Nicholls are both outstanding examples of the opportunities and success that female coaches can experience in sport. Dawn Smyth is the Manager of Coach Education and Development at Basketball Canada. She’s coached both men and women’s CCAA teams, and stayed involved with the CCAA through their Female Apprentice Coach Program. Carla Nicholls works for Athletics Canada as a National Event Group Coach and National Olympic Development Coach. Carla was responsible for launching Athletics Canada’s Women in Coaching Program, and creating their Olympic Development Program.

How did each of these women become a success story? 

Mentoring - Elite coaches involved with their sports were able to help cultivate their coaching skills and guide them to opportunities that would allow them to grow and progress.

Variety of Experiences - Dawn and Carla used a combination of their own athlete training, along with coaching experience from different levels of sport, and even some officiating to mold their coaching personas and learning.

Athlete Focus - Both women cited seeing the success and goals of the athletes come to fruition as huge motivation for what they do. This motivation fuels their desire to create programs that aid their athletes and also drives a need for continued learning.

There are various programs that are currently being promoted in Canadian sport that help women develop and achieve their goals. Opportunities and resources exist for women to become quality coaches, all it takes is for those women to choose to start coaching.

References Available from the SIRC Collection:

1. Blom L, Abrell L, Wilson M, Lape J, Halbrook M, Judge L. Working with Male Athletes: The Experiences of U.S. Female Head Coaches. ICHPER -- SD Journal Of Research In Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport & Dance. Summer2011 2011;6(1):54-61. 
2. Cooper M, Hunt K, Camille P. O. Women in Coaching: Exploring Female Athletes' Interest in the Profession. Chronicle Of Kinesiology & Physical Education In Higher Education. May 2007;18(2):8-19.
3. Kidd B. Where are the female coaches? / Où sont les entraîneures?. Canadian Journal For Women In Coaching. February 2013;13(1):1-10. 
4. Kilty K. Women in Coaching. Sport Psychologist. June 2006;20(2):222-234. Norman L. Developing female coaches: strategies from women themselves. Asia-Pacific Journal Of Health, Sport & Physical Education. December 2012;3(3):227-238. 
5. Reade I, Rodgers W, Norman L. The Under-Representation of Women in Coaching: A Comparison of Male and Female Canadian Coaches at Low and High Levels of Coaching. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. December 2009;4(4):505-520. 
6. Richman R. Title IX: The Trojan Horse in the Struggle for Female Athletic Coaches to Attain Equal Opportunities in Intercollegiate Sports. Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal. March 2011;10(2):376-413.

Accomplir le travail : les entraîneuses dans le sport

De la sportive occasionnelle à l’athlète élite*, on compte de plus en plus de filles et de femmes dans le sport. Cependant, le nombre d’entraîneuses sur le terrain n’a pas suivi la même croissance, et ce n’est pas par manque de talent. Les entraîneuses*, ou les femmes qui ont le potentiel de le devenir, sont des ressources non exploitées dans le monde du sport.

Dawn Smyth et Carla Nicholls sont deux excellents exemples de réussite concernant les entraîneuses dans le sport. Dawn Smyth est la responsable de la formation des entraîneurs à Basketball Canada. Elle a entraîné les équipes masculine et féminine de l’ACSC, et elle reste impliquée dans l’Association en participant au Programme d’apprenties entraîneuses. Carla Nicholls travaille avec Athlétisme Canada en tant que formatrice des responsables d’événements nationaux et qu’entraîneuse responsable du développement olympique national. Carla était chargée de lancer le programme d’entraîneuses d’Athlétisme Canada et de créer le programme de développement olympique de cet organisme.

Comment ces femmes ont-elles connu du succès? 

Mentorat – Les entraîneuses élites qui s’investissent dans leur sport sont en mesure d’exploiter leurs capacités de formation de façon à ce qu’elles puissent profiter d’occasions qui les feront grandir et avancer.

Diversité d’expériences – Dawn et Carla ont combiné leur expérience d’entraînement en tant qu’athlètes et qu’entraîneuses dans divers niveaux de sport, et même leur expérience en tant qu’arbitres, afin de bâtir leur profil d’entraîneur et orienter leur apprentissage.

Orientation sur les athlètes – Ces deux femmes ont mentionné que la réussite et l’atteinte des objectifs des athlètes sont une énorme motivation dans le cadre de leur travail. Cette motivation alimente leur désir de créer des programmes qui aident leurs athlètes et qui entraîne un besoin d’apprentissage continu.

Il existe plusieurs programmes qui sont actuelle

ment promus dans le milieu sportif canadien pour aider les femmes à établir des objectifs et à les atteindre. Diverses possibilités et ressources sont offertes pour que les femmes deviennent des entraîneuses de qualité; elles n’ont qu’à choisir de commencer à entraîner.
* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Blom L, Abrell L, Wilson M, Lape J, Halbrook M, Judge L. Working with Male Athletes: The Experiences of U.S. Female Head Coaches. ICHPER -- SD Journal Of Research In Health, Physical Education, Recreation, Sport & Dance. Summer2011 2011;6(1):54-61. 
2. Cooper M, Hunt K, Camille P. O. Women in Coaching: Exploring Female Athletes' Interest in the Profession. Chronicle Of Kinesiology & Physical Education In Higher Education. May 2007;18(2):8-19.
3. Kidd B. Where are the female coaches? / Où sont les entraîneures?. Canadian Journal For Women In Coaching. February 2013;13(1):1-10. 
4. Kilty K. Women in Coaching. Sport Psychologist. June 2006;20(2):222-234. Norman L. Developing female coaches: strategies from women themselves. Asia-Pacific Journal Of Health, Sport & Physical Education. December 2012;3(3):227-238. 
5. Reade I, Rodgers W, Norman L. The Under-Representation of Women in Coaching: A Comparison of Male and Female Canadian Coaches at Low and High Levels of Coaching. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. December 2009;4(4):505-520. 
6. Richman R. Title IX: The Trojan Horse in the Struggle for Female Athletic Coaches to Attain Equal Opportunities in Intercollegiate Sports. Virginia Sports & Entertainment Law Journal. March 2011;10(2):376-413.