Thursday, April 17, 2014

The effectiveness of a pre- competition routine

Athletes train to be able to perform with confidence during competition. They prepare both physically and mentally for all sceneries but there are situations that athletes cannot control on competition day such as weather, the venue or their opponents. Sometimes the unexpected can happen creating unwanted stresses. One way to help ensure athletes feel they have some sense of control is by having a pre-competition routine.

A pre-competition routine is a systematic step-by-step approach that helps you stay focused, feel prepared and in control. It is a routine that you have learned during training and are very familiar with. No matter where you are you can always duplicate it and use it to help you prepare to compete as best you can.

Advantages of having a pre-competition routine:
  • Puts the athlete in the right mindset to perform since it is something they are familiar with. 
  • It creates task specific behavior thus making useful behavior automatic. 
  • It creates a feeling of confidence and control since the athlete has done it in practice and in competition many times before. 
  • A sound routine will keep an athlete from making mistakes as it keeps the athlete engaged, away from being consumed by pressure, distractions and challenges. 
A pre-competition routine should prepare you physically, technically, mentally and tactically.

How to create general pre-competition routine
  1. Start your plan from before you compete then work backwards. 
  2. 5 to 10 minutes before competition get mentally ready by using visualization, self-talk or whatever gets you in the right mindset to compete. 
  3. Do a warm up. Depending on the sport it could include a light jog, stretching, technical drills etc. The warm up can be by your-self or with the team, depending on the sport, coach or the athlete’s preference. 
  4. Pack your equipment, uniform, water bottle etc. the night before so you do not forget anything, thus minimizing stress levels on the day of competition. 
  5. Create a music list that pumps you up and gets you into competition mood. 
Establishing a time frame for how long the routine will take is a great idea as well. By having a time frame you can then decide what time you should be arriving at your competition venue and integrating this into your preparations.

An effective pre-competition routine could be how you warm up and how you mentally prepare yourself to concentrate on the task at hand. Having one creates a sense of consistency and gives you confidence that you have done everything necessary to ready yourself for a competition.

References from the SIRC Collection:


1. Bloom G, Durand-Bush N, Salmela J. Pre- and postcompetition routines of expert coaches of team sports. / Procedures pre- et post-competitives d'entraineurs sportifs experts en sports d'equipe. Sport Psychologist. June 1997;11(2):127-141.
2. Malouff J, McGee J, Halford H, Rooke S. Effects of Pre-Competition Positive Imagery and Self-Instructions on Accuracy of Serving in Tennis. Journal Of Sport Behavior. September 2008;31(3):264-275.
3. Pain M, Harwood C, Anderson R. Pre-Competition Imagery and Music: The Impact on Flow and Performance in Competitive Soccer. Sport Psychologist. June 2011;25(2):212-232.
4. Vodičar J, Kovač E, Tušak M. EFFECTIVENESS OF ATHLETES' PRE-COMPETITION MENTAL PREPARATION. / UČINKOVITOST PSIHIČNE PRIPRAVE NA ŠPORTNIKOVA PREDTEKMOVALNA STANJA. Kinesiologia Slovenica. January 2012;18(1):22-37.
5. Wang H. Case study of promopting(sic) active self-talk for elite shooters. Sports Science/Tiyu Kexue. 1994;14(2):89-93.
6. Yeats J, Smith M. High School Volleyball Coaches Instructional Approaches and Perceptions to using Athlete Created Pre-competition Warm-up Music. Sport Science Review. December 2011;20(5/6):127-144.

L’efficacité d’une routine pré-compétition

Les athlètes s’entraînent afin de performer avec confiance durant une compétition. Ils se préparent physiquement et mentalement pour toutes les éventualités, mais certaines situations sont hors de leur contrôle, comme la météo, l’emplacement ou les adversaires. Parfois, un imprévu survient et crée un stress indésirable. Une façon de veiller à ce que les athlètes aient un sentiment de contrôle consiste à établir une routine pré-compétition*.

Une routine pré-compétition est une approche systématique étape par étape qui vous aide à rester concentré et à vous sentir prêt et en contrôle. C’est une routine que vous avez apprise durant vos entraînements et que vous connaissez bien. Peu importe où vous êtes, vous pouvez toujours la faire et vous en servir pour préparer votre jeu du mieux que vous le pouvez. 

Avantages d’une routine pré-compétition*
  • Elle permet à l’athlète de se préparer mentalement pour performer, étant donné qu’il connaît bien le processus. 
  • Elle crée un comportement propre à la tâche, ce qui rend automatique le comportement utile. 
  • Elle crée un sentiment de confiance et de contrôle puisque l’athlète a exécuté la routine en entraînement et en compétition à de nombreuses reprises. 
  • Une solide routine empêchera l’athlète de faire des erreurs, car ce dernier reste stimulé et ne pense pas à la pression, aux distractions et aux difficultés.
Une routine pré-compétition devrait vous préparer sur le plan physique, technique, mental et tactique.

Comment créer une routine pré-compétition générale
  1. Commencez votre plan à partir de la compétition et allez à reculons. 
  2. De 5 à 10 minutes avant la compétition, préparez-vous mentalement* en visualisant votre jeu, en vous motivant ou en employant n’importe quelle autre façon qui vous placera dans le bon esprit en vue de la compétition. 
  3. Faites un échauffement*. Selon le sport, il peut s’agit d’un jogging léger, d’étirements, d’exercices d’entraînement techniques, etc. L’échauffement peut se faire seul ou en équipe, en fonction du sport, de l’entraîneur ou de la préférence de l’athlète. 
  4. Préparez votre équipement, votre uniforme, votre bouteille d’eau et vos autres effets la veille afin de ne rien oublier, ce qui réduira le stress lors de la journée de la compétition. 
  5. Créez une liste de chansons* qui vous stimule et qui vous met dans l’esprit de la compétition.
Établir un échéancier concernant la durée de la routine est aussi une excellente idée. Cet échéancier vous permettra de décider du moment auquel vous arriverez à la compétition et de la façon dont vous vous préparerez.

Un exemple de routine pré-compétition efficace est la façon dont vous vous échauffez et vous préparez mentalement pour vous concentrer sur la tâche à exécuter. Cette routine assure une uniformité et vous donnera confiance puisque vous aurez fait tout le nécessaire pour vous préparer à la compétition.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:


1. Bloom G, Durand-Bush N, Salmela J. Pre- and postcompetition routines of expert coaches of team sports. / Procedures pre- et post-competitives d'entraineurs sportifs experts en sports d'equipe. Sport Psychologist. June 1997;11(2):127-141.
2. Malouff J, McGee J, Halford H, Rooke S. Effects of Pre-Competition Positive Imagery and Self-Instructions on Accuracy of Serving in Tennis. Journal Of Sport Behavior. September 2008;31(3):264-275.
3. Pain M, Harwood C, Anderson R. Pre-Competition Imagery and Music: The Impact on Flow and Performance in Competitive Soccer. Sport Psychologist. June 2011;25(2):212-232.
4. Vodičar J, Kovač E, Tušak M. EFFECTIVENESS OF ATHLETES' PRE-COMPETITION MENTAL PREPARATION. / UČINKOVITOST PSIHIČNE PRIPRAVE NA ŠPORTNIKOVA PREDTEKMOVALNA STANJA. Kinesiologia Slovenica. January 2012;18(1):22-37.
5. Wang H. Case study of promopting(sic) active self-talk for elite shooters. Sports Science/Tiyu Kexue. 1994;14(2):89-93.
6. Yeats J, Smith M. High School Volleyball Coaches Instructional Approaches and Perceptions to using Athlete Created Pre-competition Warm-up Music. Sport Science Review. December 2011;20(5/6):127-144.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

What exactly is foot pronation?

Foot pronation describes the motion of the foot after it strikes the ground. It is part of a person's natural movement that helps the lower leg deal with shock. Every person pronates to some extent and it is necessary in the normal walking cycle as it allows the forefoot to make complete contact with the ground. Some people pronate more (overpronation) or less (underpronation) than others.

What are the different kinds of pronation?

Normal pronation: The normal running gait strikes heel first, rolls to the arch, and then pushes off with the ball of the foot and allows for a more efficient push off. A person with a normal arch tends to have normal pronation.

Overpronation: When you pronate too much, your weight is transferred to the inner part of the foot, and as the runner moves forward the load is borne by the inner portion rather than the ball of the foot.  A person with a flat or flattish arch tends to overpronate.

Underpronation (supination): If you underpronate, the feet roll outwards (or remain highly rigid) when in contact with the ground. A person with a very high arch may tend to underpronate.
 
What are the risks for injury?

Excessive pronation that is not addressed can lead to a wide range of overuse injuries, affecting ligaments in the feet, ankles, hips, the achillies tendons, knees and lower back.

Is knowing your pronation type important?

Since pronation is an essential part of running mechanics it tends to be a focal point for many runners. When your natural motion becomes abnormal, it can cause alternations in the running mechanics of the entire leg which can potentially lead to a running injury. There are a few injury prevention methods available, orthotics for example, and finding a running shoe that matches your pronation patterns.

If you are unsure what your pronation type is, the best way to find out is to get running gait analyzed by a podiatrist or sports therapist. This way, you can be sure that you will get an accurate diagnosis of your running style, which will ultimately help you determine the best training methods and products that suit your individual needs.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Cheung R, Ng G. Influence of Different Footwear on Force of Landing During Running. Physical Therapy. May 2008;88(5):620-628.
2. Efficacies of different external controls for excessive foot pronation: a meta-analysis. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. July 15, 2011;45(9):743-751.
3. Gojanovic B. Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study. Schweizerische Zeitschrift Für Sportmedizin & Sporttraumatologie. December 2013;61(4):52-53.
4. Halvorson R. Does Foot Pronation Cause Injury?. IDEA Fitness Journal. October 2013;10(9):11. 
5. Zambelli Pinto R, Souza T, Maher C. External devices (including orthotics) to control excessive foot pronation. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. February 2012;46(2):110-111.

Qu’est-ce que la pronation des pieds?

La pronation* est le mouvement des pieds lorsque ceux-ci touchent le sol. Elle fait partie du mouvement naturel d’une personne et aide le bas de la jambe à encaisser le choc des pas. Tout le monde effectue une pronation jusqu’à une certaine mesure, et cette pronation est nécessaire au cycle de marche normal, puisqu’elle permet à l’avant-pied de toucher complètement le sol. Certaines personnes effectuent une pronation plus ou moins prononcée que d’autres, c.-à-d. une surpronation ou une souspronation.

Quels sont les différents types de pronation? 

Pronation normale* : Dans le train de course normal*, le talon touche le sol en premier, puis le pied roule sur l’arc et exerce une pression sur la partie antérieure du pied, ce qui permet de prendre un meilleur élan pour faire le pas suivant. Une personne ayant un arc normal risque d’avoir une pronation normale.

Surpronation* : Si une pronation est excessive, le poids est transféré à la partie intérieure du pied. Lorsque le coureur avance, le poids est alors soutenu par cette partie au lieu de la partie antérieure du pied. Une personne ayant un arc un peu ou complètement plat a tendance à faire une surpronation.

Souspronation (supination)* : Dans le cas d’une souspronation, le pied avance vers l’extérieur (ou demeure très rigide) lorsqu’il touche le sol. Une personne ayant un arc très prononcé pourrait avoir tendance à présenter une souspronation.

Quels sont les risques de blessure? 

Une pronation excessive qui n’est pas traitée peut entraîner une multitude de blessures attribuables au surmenage*, qui touchent les ligaments des pieds, les chevilles, les hanches, les tendons d’Achille, les genoux et le bas du dos.

Est-ce important de connaître son type de pronation? 

Comme la pronation est une partie essentielle du mécanisme de course, de nombreux coureurs se penchent sérieusement sur le sujet. Si votre mouvement naturel devient inhabituel, il peut provoquer des changements au mécanisme de course de toute la jambe, ce qui peut entraîner une blessure de course. Il existe quelques méthodes de prévention de blessure, comme l’orthétique, ou vous pouvez simplement trouver des souliers qui correspondent à votre type de pronation.

Si vous n’êtes pas sûr de votre type de pronation, la meilleure façon de le connaître est de faire analyser votre train de course par un podiatre ou un thérapeute sportif. De cette façon, vous vous assurerez d’avoir un diagnostic précis concernant votre style de course, ce qui vous aidera à déterminer les méthodes et les produits d’entraînement qui vous conviennent le mieux et qui répondent à tous vos besoins.
 * Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Cheung R, Ng G. Influence of Different Footwear on Force of Landing During Running. Physical Therapy. May 2008;88(5):620-628.
2. Efficacies of different external controls for excessive foot pronation: a meta-analysis. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. July 15, 2011;45(9):743-751.
3. Gojanovic B. Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe: a 1-year prospective cohort study. Schweizerische Zeitschrift Für Sportmedizin & Sporttraumatologie. December 2013;61(4):52-53.
4. Halvorson R. Does Foot Pronation Cause Injury?. IDEA Fitness Journal. October 2013;10(9):11. 
5. Zambelli Pinto R, Souza T, Maher C. External devices (including orthotics) to control excessive foot pronation. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. February 2012;46(2):110-111.

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Sport and Mental Health

Athletes are often perceived by the public to be fitter, healthier and happier than others. In fact, athletes are not immune from mental health issues, and can struggle just like the rest of us. Along with the stigma attached to mental health, especially in the sporting world where mental toughness is as valued as physical toughness, it can be difficult for athletes to seek help. That's why SIRC has compiled articles on the stigma of mental health, athletes battling depression and anxiety, signs of athlete burnout and understanding mental health issues.

SIRC Newsletter: http://www.sirc.ca/newsletters/April14/index.html

Le sport et la santé mentale

Le public perçoit souvent les athlètes comme étant plus en forme, plus en santé et plus heureux que le reste des gens. En fait, les athlètes ne sont pas immunisés contre les maladies mentales et peuvent vivre des moments difficiles comme tout le monde. Le stigmate de la santé mentale, particulièrement dans le monde sportif dans lequel la force mentale est considérée comme une force physique, peut faire en sorte que l’athlète hésitera à chercher de l’aide. SIRC a donc regroupé des articles sur le stigmate de la santé mentale, sur les athlètes souffrant de dépression et d’anxiété, sur les signes d’épuisement professionnel et sur la compréhension des maladies mentales.

Bulletin du SIRC: http://sirc.ca/newsletters/April14/Index_f.html

Polarized training approach

During the Sochi Olympic Winter games in the Adler speed skating arena, the Dutch speed skating team showed total dominance as they hauled in 24 medals out of a possible 36. In fact, the Netherlands’ total medals came from speed skating only. A recent study on the Dutch speed skating team concluded that in the last 38 years, the Olympic team has shifted its training approach towards polarized training. This training approach has also been used by endurance athletes in other sports such as rowing, cycling and running to name a few.

Polarized training is an approach which emphasizes that the hard days should be very hard and easy days be very easy. These days are polar opposites - hence polarized training. The benefit of this approach is to be able to train hard on the hard days, recover on the easy days and then be able to train hard again, since you have recovered on your easy day.

A study done on high performance elite endurance athletes suggested that when using the polarized training approach, 75 percent of the training should be low intensity, zone 1 and 15 to 20 percent at very high intensity, zone 3. The other 5 to 10 percent should concentrate on threshold or tempo training, zone 2.

Training zones:
  1. Zone 1 is low intensity where your heart rate is below 80 percent of maximum. This is the zone you should be in on your very easy days. 
  2. Zone 2 is moderate intensity, which is between low intensity and high intensity. Your heart rate should be between 80 and 90 percent of maximum. 
  3. Zone 3 is high intensity training. Your heart rate is above 90 percent. This is where you should be on your very hard days.
Though most of your training time should ideally be in zone 1, threshold training can still be carried out, which is zone 2. In a study done on recreational runners, polarized training was shown to improve a 10km performance by 5 percent as compared to 3.6 percent in runners who used the threshold training approach, where the majority of training time is spent in zone 2.

It is important to make sure that your easy days are easy and hard days are hard. Training in the moderate zone on the easy days will prevent you from going as hard as you otherwise could on the hard days. Before embarking on polarized training, talk to your coach or other athletes who use the approach to best understand if it is the right training approach for you.

References Available from the SIRC Collection:


1. Hongjun Y, Xiaoping C, Weimo Z, Chunmei C. A Quasi-Experimental Study of Chinese Top-Level Speed Skaters' Training Load: Threshold Versus Polarized Model. International Journal Of Sports Physiology & Performance. June 2012;7(2):103-112.
2. HUTCHINSON A. HUTCHINSON. Runner's World. November 2013;48(11):46.
3. Laursen P. Training for intense exercise performance: high-intensity or high-volume training?. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. October 2, 2010;20:1-10.
4. Orie J, Hofman N, de Koning J, Foster C. Thirty-Eight Years of Training Distribution in Olympic Speed Skaters. International Journal Of Sports Physiology & Performance. January 2014;9(1):93-99.
5. Seiler K, Kjerland G. Quantifying training intensity distribution in elite endurance athletes: is there evidence for an “optimal” distribution?. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. February 2006;16(1):49-56.
6. xC5;.#Fiskerstrand Â, Seiler K. Training and performance characteristics among Norwegian International Rowers 1970–2001. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. October 2004;14(5):303-310.