Thursday, May 29, 2014

Is there such a thing as placebo sleep?

It is estimated that the average human will spent 36% of their life sleeping. If you lived to be 75 years old, 27 of those years will be spent sleeping. Sleeping is one of the most important human functions and a lack of it can affect our memory, increase impulsiveness, promote weight gain and add to stress levels.

A recent study looked at how placebo sleep affects cognitive function. Participants analyzed in the study were told that quality REM sleep constituted between 20-25% of their total sleep. One group was told that 28.7% of their sleep was in REM sleep and the other group was told that they were spending 16.2% in REM sleep during the night. The participants who were told that they had above normal quality sleep, 28.7%, scored significantly higher on the PASAT, a measure of cognitive function that specifically assesses auditory information, and the COWAT, a cognitive test of verbal processing ability, compared to participants who were told they had below average REM sleep.

The perception of how well you sleep might have an effect on how well you perform. Placebo sleep suggests that regardless of the quality of sleep, believing you had quality sleep can influence cognitive function. Talking of how tired you are can also negatively affect your ability to perform. 

Some tips for a good night sleep
  • Sleep in a dark room that is slightly cool 
  • Turn off all your technology (cell phones, computers, etc.) 
  • Avoid consuming caffeine late in the day; ideally not after lunch 
  • Seek out morning light. Sunlight in morning helps the body’s internal biological clock reset itself each day. 
Getting quality sleep helps you function properly throughout the day. It is recommended that adults, including the elderly get 7-8 hours of sleep. Teens should get 9-10 hours of sleep. Sleeping well is as crucial as eating a balanced diet and exercising regularly.

References from the SIRC Collection:


1. Al-Sharman A, Siengsukon C. Sleep Enhances Learning of a Functional Motor Task in Young Adults. Physical Therapy. December 2013;93(12):1625-1635.
2. Beedie C, Coleman D, Foad A. Positive and Negative Placebo Effects Resulting From the Deceptive Administration of an Ergogenic Aid. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. June 2007;17(3):259-269.
3. BRACKO M. Sleep: THE Athlete's Steroid. IDEA Fitness Journal. November 2013;10(10):44-50.
4. Diefenbach K, Donath F, Roots I, et al. Randomised, Double-Blind Study of the Effects of Oxybutynin, Tolterodine, Trospium Chloride and Placebo on Sleep in Healthy Young Volunteers. Clinical Drug Investigation. June 2003;23(6):395-404.
5. Lloret-Linares C, Lafuente-Lafuente C, Bergmann J, et al. Does a single cup of coffee at dinner alter the sleep? A controlled cross-over randomised trial in real-life conditions. Nutrition & Dietetics. December 2012;69(4):250-255.
6. Yuuka H, Yoshiaki N, Takuro H, Sotoyuki U. The Effects of Different Intensities of Exercise on Night Sleep. Advances In Exercise & Sports Physiology. February 2014;20(1):19-24.

Le sommeil placebo existe-t-il vraiment?

On estime qu’un humain moyen passe 36 % de sa vie à dormir*. Autrement dit, si vous vivez 75 ans, vous passerez 27 années à dormir. Le sommeil est l’une des fonctions humaines des plus importantes, et un manque de sommeil peut nuire à la mémoire, augmenter l’impulsivité, favoriser la prise de poids et accroître le stress.

Une récente étude a examiné les effets du sommeil placebo sur les fonctions cognitives*. Dans le cadre de l’étude, on a mentionné à un premier groupe de participants qu’un sommeil paradoxal de qualité représente de 20 % à 25 % du sommeil total. On a dit à un second groupe que 28,7 % du sommeil est paradoxal, et un troisième groupe s’est fait dire que ce type de sommeil constituait 16,2 % de leur nuit. Les participants à qui on a signalé que la durée de leur sommeil de qualité était au-dessus de la normale (28,7 %) ont eu une note considérablement plus élevée au PASAT*, une mesure des fonctions cognitives qui évalue spécifiquement l’information auditive, de même qu’au COWAT*, un test cognitif visant la capacité de traitement verbal, que les participants à qui on a dit que leur sommeil paradoxal était plus faible que la moyenne.

La perception de la qualité du sommeil peut avoir une incidence sur la performance. Le sommeil placebo démontre que peu importe la qualité de votre sommeil, si vous croyez avoir bien dormi, vous entraînerez un effet positif sur vos fonctions cognitives. Au contraire, si vous vous plaignez d’être fatigué, vous risquez de nuire à vos capacités.

Conseils pour avoir une bonne nuit de sommeil*
  • Dormez dans une pièce sombre et fraîche. 
  • Éteignez tous vos appareils électroniques (cellulaires, ordinateurs, etc.). 
  • Évitez de consommer de la caféine tard en journée – idéalement, pas plus tard qu’au dîner. 
  • Profitez de la lumière du matin. La lumière du soleil le matin aide votre corps à redémarrer votre horloge biologique chaque jour. 
Un sommeil de qualité vous aidera à bien fonctionner durant la journée. On recommandeaux adultes, y compris les personnes âgées, de dormir de sept à huit heures par jour. Quant à eux, les adolescents devraient avoir une nuit de sommeil de neuf à dix heures. Bien dormir est aussi important qu’avoir une alimentation équilibrée et que faire de l’exercice régulièrement.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Al-Sharman A, Siengsukon C. Sleep Enhances Learning of a Functional Motor Task in Young Adults. Physical Therapy. December 2013;93(12):1625-1635.
2. Beedie C, Coleman D, Foad A. Positive and Negative Placebo Effects Resulting From the Deceptive Administration of an Ergogenic Aid. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. June 2007;17(3):259-269.
3. BRACKO M. Sleep: THE Athlete's Steroid. IDEA Fitness Journal. November 2013;10(10):44-50.
4. Diefenbach K, Donath F, Roots I, et al. Randomised, Double-Blind Study of the Effects of Oxybutynin, Tolterodine, Trospium Chloride and Placebo on Sleep in Healthy Young Volunteers. Clinical Drug Investigation. June 2003;23(6):395-404.
5. Lloret-Linares C, Lafuente-Lafuente C, Bergmann J, et al. Does a single cup of coffee at dinner alter the sleep? A controlled cross-over randomised trial in real-life conditions. Nutrition & Dietetics. December 2012;69(4):250-255.
6. Yuuka H, Yoshiaki N, Takuro H, Sotoyuki U. The Effects of Different Intensities of Exercise on Night Sleep. Advances In Exercise & Sports Physiology. February 2014;20(1):19-24.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Hockey in the Streets

by Richard Halfyard
Library and Information Technician Intern

Now that the Stanley Cup Playoffs are under way many Canadian hockey fans have settled down to watch their favorite team play. This time long tradition of watching ice hockey athletes compete at a high level of competiveness to win Lord Stanley’s Cup has inspired generations to follow this dream. Ice hockey is the most identifiable form of hockey, but there are others. One of the more popular alternatives to ice hockey is ball hockey.

How is ball hockey different than ice hockey?

Ice hockey and ball hockey have many similarities, but there are some notable differences. Ball hockey is played primarily on the streets, or on a ground surface as opposed to ice. The size of the playing surface and the enforcement of the rules can be different depending on the competition. In game rules such as the floating blue line and reduced period length also make the game unique from its ice counterpart.

The Popularity of Ball Hockey 

From June 2-9 2013 the International Ball Hockey Championships was held in St John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador. The tournament attracted 17 men’s teams and 8 women’s teams from across the globe to compete for the world championship. This sport is now represented in non-traditional hockey countries such as Bermuda and Greece as these teams competed at the championships. In Canada alone, the Canadian Ball Hockey Association oversees 3 types of national championships, 2 regional championships and sends 4 Team Canada teams to international competitions. There are also many local ball hockey leagues throughout the country.

CBC’s Play On! 

The Play ON! Tournament is a national street hockey tournament currently sponsored by the CBC. It is known as Canada’s largest sports festival and has grown from 1 tournament in Halifax, Nova Scotia to 21 tournaments held in different cities from coast to coast. This tournament encourages different levels of competition, but more importantly encourages participation from as many people as possible. There is a call for players, officials and conveners every year. If you want to meet new people while being involved in the game then check out the Play ON! website for details.

Ball hockey is part of our hockey culture. It may not offer the same look and feel as a sheet of ice at the local community arena, but it has its own unique characteristics that make it a popular sport. It is cost effective while remaining competitive. People of all ages and backgrounds can play while organizations, tournaments and festivals have taken the sport to new levels. Ball hockey is definitely something that everyone should try.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1, Feist, Larry. "Stand On Guard." Ontario Hockey Now (2014): 5. 
2. "Hockey Rules Group Suggests Points Of Emphasis, Future Rules." NCAA News (2009): 2. 
3. Mikkola, Juha. "Floorball - An Indoor Hockey Evolution. / L'unihockey - Dans Le Sillon Du Hockey En Salle: Une Activité Parfaite Pour Les Écoles Canadiennes." Physical & Health Education Journal 77.3 (2011): 36-43. 
4. Perkins, Graham. "Play On Street Hockey Event Sweeps The Nation." Ontario Hockey Now 8.5 (2009): 21. "Road Hockey Tourney Creates Lasting Heroes." Ontario Hockey Now 7.16 (2008): 11.

Hockey-balle

Richard Halfyard
Library Information Technician Intern

Alors que les séries éliminatoires de la coupe Stanley battent leur plein, de nombreux partisans de hockey sont rivés à leurs écrans pour regarder leur équipe favorite. Cette tradition de longue date, c’est-à-dire de regarder des athlètes de hockey sur glace* se livrer une compétition de haut calibre pour remporter la coupe de Lord Stanley, a inspiré des générations à suivre le rêve de jouer au hockey. Le hockey sur glace est le type de hockey le plus reconnaissable, mais il en existe d’autres. Une variante très populaire est le hockey-balle*.

En quoi le hockey-balle diffère-t-il du hockey sur glace? 

Le hockey sur glace et le hockey-balle ont de nombreuses ressemblances, mais il y a aussi des différences marquantes. Le hockey-balle se joue principalement dans la rue ou au sol, et non sur la glace. La taille de la surface de jeu et l’application des règles peut aussi varier selon la compétition. Certaines règles du jeu, comme avoir une ligne bleue flottante ou une durée de période réduite, peuvent aussi rendre le hockey-balle bien différent des autres types de hockey.

La popularité du hockey-balle 

Du 2 au 9 juin 2013, les Championnats internationaux de hockey-balle* se sont tenus à St. John's (Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador). Le tournoi a rassemblé 17 équipes masculines et 8 équipes féminines de partout au pays pour qu’elles se battent pour le championnat mondial. Ce sport est maintenant représenté dans des pays où le hockey n’est pas un sport très pratiqué, comme les Bermudes et la Grèce. Au Canada, l’Association canadienne de hockey-balle* supervise trois types de championnats nationaux et deux championnats régionaux, en plus d’envoyer quatre équipes canadiennes aux compétitions internationales. Il existe également de nombreuses ligues de hockey-balle locales d’un océan à l’autre.

Le tournoi Au jeu! de la CBC 

Le tournoi Au jeu! est une compétition nationale de hockey de rue actuellement commanditée par la CBC. Cet événement est reconnu comme étant le plus grand festival sportif du Canada, ayant passé d’une épreuve tenue à Halifax (Nouvelle-Écosse) à 21 tournois dans plusieurs villes de tout le pays. Ce championnat vise divers niveaux de participants, mais l’objectif principal est de solliciter la participation du plus grand nombre de sportifs possible. Chaque année, un appel est lancé pour encourager la participation de joueurs, d’arbitres et d’animateurs. Si vous voulez faire de nouvelles connaissances tout en pratiquant ce sport, consultez le site Web d’Au jeu! pour obtenir plus de renseignements.

Le hockey-balle fait partie de notre culture de hockey. Il n’offre peut-être pas la même sensation qu’un sport pratiqué dans une patinoire locale, mais il a des caractéristiques uniques qui le rendent populaire. De plus, c’est une activité rentable et compétitive. Les personnes de tous âge et milieu peuvent jouer, puisque les organisations, les tournois et les festivals ont accru la visibilité de ce sport. Le hockey-balle est assurément un sport que tout le monde devrait essayer. 
* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1, Feist, Larry. "Stand On Guard." Ontario Hockey Now (2014): 5. 
2. "Hockey Rules Group Suggests Points Of Emphasis, Future Rules." NCAA News (2009): 2. 
3. Mikkola, Juha. "Floorball - An Indoor Hockey Evolution. / L'unihockey - Dans Le Sillon Du Hockey En Salle: Une Activité Parfaite Pour Les Écoles Canadiennes." Physical & Health Education Journal 77.3 (2011): 36-43. 
4. Perkins, Graham. "Play On Street Hockey Event Sweeps The Nation." Ontario Hockey Now 8.5 (2009): 21. "Road Hockey Tourney Creates Lasting Heroes." Ontario Hockey Now 7.16 (2008): 11.

Thursday, May 22, 2014

How can caffeine enhance athletic performance?

Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. It can be found in plants, prescription and non-prescription medication, cola soft drinks, and energy drinks. In the world of athletics, caffeine is an ergogenic aid, a substance used for a competitive advantage.

There is general agreement that caffeine does not appear to benefit athletes in short-term exercise, such as sprints, that have durations of a few seconds up to 90 seconds. These short-term exercises derive their energy from the anaerobic system. However, caffeine does seem to help endurance athletes in sports such as cycling, running and soccer.

How does it work? Muscles use glycogen to fuel the body and once depleted, exhaustion occurs. Another source of fuel the body uses is fat. Caffeine may encourage muscles to use fat as it mobilizes fat stores. This delays the depletion of muscle glycogen allowing an individual to exercise longer before exhaustion occurs.

The consumption of 3- 9 mg/kg of body weight has been found to increase endurance performance in cycling and running as observed in a laboratory setting. However the higher the mg/kg intake does not necessary equate to a better performance. Moderate caffeine ingestion of 5-6 mg/kg of body weight by cyclists during a laboratory setting has shown to increase performance in bouts of 4-6 minutes of intensity.

Though caffeine has been found to enhance performance, its effect on people varies depending on size, age, sex and how sensitive you are to caffeine. The side effects of caffeine can cause:
  • Restlessness 
  • Nervousness 
  • Insomnia 
  • Tremors
When deciding to use caffeine it is wise to know that everybody will react differently and performance can decrease due to the side effects. Using it in training and evaluating how an individual responds to caffeine maybe the best way to approach it before using it in competition.

References from the SIRC Collection: 


1. Aedma M, Timpmann S, íöpik V. Effect of Caffeine on Upper-Body Anaerobic Performance in Wrestlers in Simulated Competition-Day Conditions. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. December 2013;23(6):601-609.
2. BROWN S, BROWN J, FOSKETT A. The Effects of Caffeine on Repeated Sprint Performance in Team Sport Athletes - A Meta-Analysis-. Sport Science Review. April 2013;22(1/2):25-32.
3. CHOW E. Caffeine and Performance. Bicycle Paper. March 2014;43(1):5.
4. Del Coso J, Muñoz G, Muñoz-Guerra J. Prevalence of caffeine use in elite athletes following its removal from the World Anti-Doping Agency list of banned substances. Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism. August 2011;36(4):555-561.
5. IRWIN C, DESBROW B, ELLIS A, O'KEEFFE B, GRANT G, LEVERITT M. Caffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performance. Journal Of Sports Sciences. March 2011;29(5):509-515.
6. Rogers P, Heatherley S, Mullings E, Smith J. Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance. Psychopharmacology. March 15, 2013;226(2):229-240.
7. Spence A, Sim M, Landers G, Peeling P. A Comparison of Caffeine Versus Pseudoephedrine on Cycling Time-Trial Performance. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. October 2013;23(5):507-512.

La caféine améliore-t-elle la performance athlétique?

La caféine est la substance psychoactive la plus consommée au monde. On la retrouve dans les plantes, dans des médicaments sur ordonnance et en vente libre, dans des boissons gazeuses à base de cola et dans des boissons énergisantes. Dans le monde du sport, la caféine est un acide ergogénique*, une substance utilisée pour obtenir un avantage compétitif.

De façon générale, il est entendu que la caféine ne semble pas avantager les athlètes lors d’exercices courts qui durent moins de 90 secondes, comme des sprints. Ce genre d’exercice consomme de l’énergie du système anaérobique. Cependant, la caféine semble aider les athlètes d’endurancedans des sports comme le cyclisme, la course et le soccer*.

Comment la caféine fonctionne-t-elle? Les muscles utilisent du glycogène pour alimenter le corps, et c’est lorsque la réserve de glycogène est vide que l’athlète souffre d’épuisement. Une autre source d’énergie est le gras. La caféine peut faire en sorte que les muscles utilisent le gras, car elle mobilise les réserves de graisse. Ce processus retarde l’épuisement de glycogène musculaire*, ce qui permet à l’athlète de performer plus longtemps avant de s’épuiser.

Selon des observations effectuées dans un laboratoire, la consommation de trois à neuf milligrammes de caféine par kilogramme de masse corporelle augmenterait la performance d’endurance de cyclistes et de coureurs. Cependant, il est faux de dire que plus le ratio est élevé, plus la performance sera optimale. Une consommation modérée de caféine de cinq ou six milligrammes par kilogramme de masse corporelle par des cyclistes lors d’une séance en laboratoire s’est traduite par une hausse de la performance d’environ quatre à six minutes d’intensité.

Bien qu’il ait été constaté que la caféine améliore la performance, ses effets sur les personnesvarient selon la taille, l’âge, le sexe et la tolérance à la caféine de celles-ci. Les effets indésirables de la caféine peuvent causer :
  • de l’agitation; 
  • de la nervosité; 
  • de l’insomnie; 
  • des tremblements. 
En ce qui a trait à la consommation de caféine, il est bon de savoir que chaque personne y réagit différemment et que ses effets indésirables peuvent nuire à la performance. La meilleure approche serait de l’utiliser en entraînement et évaluer la réaction de l’athlète avant de s’en servir en compétition.
* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:


1. Aedma M, Timpmann S, íöpik V. Effect of Caffeine on Upper-Body Anaerobic Performance in Wrestlers in Simulated Competition-Day Conditions. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. December 2013;23(6):601-609.
2. BROWN S, BROWN J, FOSKETT A. The Effects of Caffeine on Repeated Sprint Performance in Team Sport Athletes - A Meta-Analysis-. Sport Science Review. April 2013;22(1/2):25-32.
3. CHOW E. Caffeine and Performance. Bicycle Paper. March 2014;43(1):5.
4. Del Coso J, Muñoz G, Muñoz-Guerra J. Prevalence of caffeine use in elite athletes following its removal from the World Anti-Doping Agency list of banned substances. Applied Physiology, Nutrition & Metabolism. August 2011;36(4):555-561.
5. IRWIN C, DESBROW B, ELLIS A, O'KEEFFE B, GRANT G, LEVERITT M. Caffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performance. Journal Of Sports Sciences. March 2011;29(5):509-515.
6. Rogers P, Heatherley S, Mullings E, Smith J. Faster but not smarter: effects of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on alertness and performance. Psychopharmacology. March 15, 2013;226(2):229-240.
7. Spence A, Sim M, Landers G, Peeling P. A Comparison of Caffeine Versus Pseudoephedrine on Cycling Time-Trial Performance. International Journal Of Sport Nutrition & Exercise Metabolism. October 2013;23(5):507-512.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Are you Ready to Run?

Running is a form of exercise that can help you improve your overall health and wellness, and you don't need to train for a marathon to receive the benefits. It’s convenient, you can do it anywhere, anytime, and it’s relatively cheap – all you need is a good pair of shoes. Since running is a natural motion there is not a lot of special skills to learn, but it is still important to train properly so your experience remains positive and injury-free.

The SIRC Newsletter is now available online: http://www.sirc.ca/newsletters/mid-may14/index.html

Prêt à courir?

La course est une forme d’exercice qui vous aide à améliorer votre santé et mieux-être global, et vous n’avez pas à vous entraîner en vue d’un marathon pour profiter des bienfaits. C’est un exercice pratique que vous pouvez faire n’importe où, en tout temps, et qui est peu coûteux : vous n’avez besoin que d’une bonne paire de souliers. Comme courir est un mouvement naturel, il n’y a pas beaucoup d’aptitudes particulières à apprendre, mais il est tout de même important de s’entraîner adéquatement afin que l’expérience demeure plaisante et sans risque de blessure.

Bulletin du SIRC: http://sirc.ca/newsletters/mid-May14/Index_f.html

Marathon Training Tips for Beginners

If you’re planning on running your first marathon this year, before you start your training, it’s important to create a training plan. Your training program should include answers on how much you are willing and able to train, your experience as a distance runner, and what your fitness level is before the race. Make sure your running plan fits your real ability, not the ability you wish you had. Everyone is different and it can be difficult to find what works for you. 

Goal Setting - Knowing what kind of goals to set and knowing how to see what goals are realistic for you are two very important things that aren’t that hard to understand when you really look at them.
  • Process Goals - These types of goals involve activities that focus on mastering the task and increasing one's skill level. 
  • Outcome Goals - These goals relate to the finished product or stated differently, goals you hope to accomplish in the marathon. 
Distance - Almost every runner gauges his or her training by weekly mileage. Good training plans will have a suggested daily and weekly running goal. The schedule should be well laid out, and easy to track in your running log. If a day or two of training is missed due to injury or illness, don't try to squeeze two days of training into one. It’s best to just pick-up where you left off and continue; lost days are simply lost.

Long Runs – Your training program should have a gradual build up in your weekly long run distance. This long, slow distance run is the most important part of your running week and you need to develop the ability to complete your long runs without over-taxing your body. For beginners, a slow pace is best so that you focus on simply clocking up miles without the risk of injury from pushing too hard too fast.

Recovery/Rest Days - Giving your muscles a day off from running helps them get stronger. If you want to do something on rest days, try a low-impact cross training workout. Nutrition and eating the right foods at the right time also play a vital role in recovery. Take recovery days equally as serious as your running days.

Keep in mind that there is no magic formula to follow to reach your potential. The above information includes best practices so that you can create an optimal training schedule as well as maximize your enjoyment of running.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Avery G. Finding Your Personal Marathon Training and Racing Zone. Marathon & Beyond. January 2007;11(1):117-132. 
2. Beginners Welcome. Running & Fitnews. November 2006;25(1):3-5. 
3. Haugaard Rasmussen C, Oestergaard Nielsen R, Serup Juul M, Rasmussen S. WEEKLY RUNNING VOLUME AND RISK OF RUNNING-RELATED INJURIES AMONG MARATHON RUNNERS. International Journal Of Sports Physical Therapy. April 2013;8(2):111-120. 
4. Heintz A. Choosing the Perfect Marathon Training Program. Marathon & Beyond. January 2010;14(1):44-55. 
5. Karp J. The Right Way to Train for a Marathon. IDEA Fitness Journal. November 2013;10(10):28-31. 
6. Stevenson R. Marathon Training for Beginners: It's All About the Mileage. Marathon & Beyond. September 2011;15(5):22-38.

Entraînement au marathon pour débutants

Si vous prévoyez courir votre premier marathon cette année, il est important que vous ayez un plan d’entraînement* avant de commencer à vous entraîner. Votre programme d’entraînement devrait comprendre de l’information sur votre volonté et votre capacité à vous entraîner, sur votre expérience en tant que coureur de distance et sur votre condition physique avant la course. Assurez-vous que votre plan de course correspond à votre capacité réelle et non à celle que vous souhaiteriez avoir. Chaque personne est différente, et il peut être difficile de bien cibler ce qui vous convient le mieux.

Établissement des objectifs – Il est très important de savoir quel type d’objectifs vous souhaitez établir et d’être en mesure de déterminer si ces derniers sont réalistes. Vous verrez, ce n’est pas tellement sorcier.
  • Objectifs axés sur les processus – Ce genre d’objectif comprend des activités qui mettent l’accent sur l’exécution des tâches et l’amélioration des habiletés. 
  • Objectifs axés sur les résultats – Ces objectifs visent le résultat final ou, autrement dit, les cibles que vous souhaitez atteindre en participant à un marathon.
Distance – Presque tous les coureurs évaluent leur entraînement en fonction de la distance* parcourue chaque semaine. Un bon plan d’entraînement comprend un objectif de course quotidien et hebdomadaire. L’horaire devrait être bien établi et facile à suivre dans un journal de course. Si vous ratez une ou deux journées d’entraînement en raison d’une blessure ou d’une maladie, n’essayez pas combiner deux journées en une. Il est préférable de reprendre votre entraînement là où vous l’avez laissé; les journées perdues sont simplement perdues.

Longues courses – Votre programme d’entraînement devrait comprendre une progression de la distance hebdomadaire à parcourir dans le cadre de longues courses. Ces courses, qui sont lentes et longues, sont la partie la plus importante de votre semaine de course. Vous devez en effet développer votre capacité à terminer les longues courses* sans surtaxer votre corps. Pour les débutants, il est conseillé de suivre un rythme lent et de se concentrer simplement à parcourir la distance en évitant des blessures attribuables au surentraînement ou à une vitesse trop élevée.

Jours de repos et de récupération – Donner à vos muscles une journée de congé de course leur permet de se renforcer. Si vous voulez faire de l’exercice lors des journées de repos, faites des activités d’entraînement croisé qui ont un faible impact sur le corps. Une saine nutrition en moment opportun joue également un rôle essentiel dans le cadre de la récupération. Prenez vos jours de repos aussi sérieusement que les jours de course.

N’oubliez pas qu’il n’existe pas de formule magique pour atteindre votre potentiel. Les renseignements ci-dessus comprennent des pratiques exemplaires* qui vous permettront de créer un horaire d’entraînement optimal et de maximiser votre plaisir de course.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Avery G. Finding Your Personal Marathon Training and Racing Zone. Marathon & Beyond. January 2007;11(1):117-132. 
2. Beginners Welcome. Running & Fitnews. November 2006;25(1):3-5. 
3. Haugaard Rasmussen C, Oestergaard Nielsen R, Serup Juul M, Rasmussen S. WEEKLY RUNNING VOLUME AND RISK OF RUNNING-RELATED INJURIES AMONG MARATHON RUNNERS. International Journal Of Sports Physical Therapy. April 2013;8(2):111-120. 
4. Heintz A. Choosing the Perfect Marathon Training Program. Marathon & Beyond. January 2010;14(1):44-55. 
5. Karp J. The Right Way to Train for a Marathon. IDEA Fitness Journal. November 2013;10(10):28-31. 6. Stevenson R. Marathon Training for Beginners: It's All About the Mileage. Marathon & Beyond. September 2011;15(5):22-38.

Thursday, May 15, 2014

Optimal performance in a trusting frame of mind

Athletes practice and train to be able to duplicate what they have learned from these sessions come match time. Being instinctive during a game allows for consistency and proper execution. To be able to compete at your best, an athlete’s trust in the skills learned and developed during practice can lead to better performances and build mental toughness.

In team sports, players are united in the pursuit of accomplishing a set of goals. These goals can be team goals, individual goals or goals set by the coaching staff. This creates a situation where every individual has a role to play, and whether big or small it has an effect on the outcome. Accordingly, an athlete who is competent with their play is likely to make the team performance that much greater. Trusting what you have mastered during practice minimizes the controlling tendencies and makes movements automatic. The trust in your mastery of skills enhances accuracy, confidence and complexity of your abilities.

Trusting your ability in competition can lead to:
  • Better decision making as you are less likely to second guess yourself
  • Use of better techniques and better plays to avoid mistakes 
  • Taking smart calculated risks and not over analyzing 
  • Not thinking too far head or focusing on past mistakes 
Trust in your ability to make that last minute catch builds self-confidence and eliminates doubt. But before you can get to make that big catch in an effortless manner, you have to learn it in practice and not during competition. Competition is where you take what you have learned and put it to the test. As you do more repetitions and develop your skills you attain muscle memory. Muscle memory allows you to execute plays without having to overthink about movement.

Trusting the skills you have learned and developed during practices allows for performances to be automatic. Athletes who trust their game are usually the athletes who want the game to be in their hands in tough situations. The trust they have in their skills makes their performance seem effortless.

References from the SIRC Collection: 


1. Curry L, Maniar S. Academic Course for Enhancing Student-Athlete Performance in Sport. Sport Psychologist. September 2004;18(3):297-316.
2. Kruger-Davis M. WHEN I MISS, IS IT SELF DOUBT?. Australian Clay Target Shooting News. August 2013;66(8):18.
3. Moore W, Stevenson J. Understanding Trust in the Performance of Complex Automatic Sport Skills. Sport Psychologist. September 1991;5(3):281-289.
4. Stevenson J, Stephenson P, Hoffman M, Jager T, Vanengen E, Pinter M. Effect of Training for Trust in Putting Performance of Skilled Golfers: A Randomized Controlled Trial. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2, 2007;2(0):67-85.
5. Stevenson J, Moore B, Brossman M, et al. Effects of Trust Training on Tee and Pitch Shots in Golf. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2, 2007;2(0):47-66.
6. Vieira D, Palmer S. The Coaching Skills Self-Efficacy Scale (CSSES): A validation study among a Portuguese sample. Coaching Psychologist. June 2012;8(1):6-11.

Performance optimale dans un état d’esprit de confiance

Les athlètes s’entraînent pour mettre en œuvre dans les parties ce qu’ils ont appris lors des entraînements. L’instinctdurant un match assure une constance et une bonne exécution. Pour performer à son meilleur, l’athlète doit avoir confianceen les habiletés qu’il a apprises et développées durant l’entraînement, ce qui lui permettra aussi de renforcer sa force mentale*.

Dans les sports d’équipe, les joueurs sont unis et visent à atteindre des objectifs précis. Ces derniers peuvent être des cibles d’équipe ou individuels ou peuvent être établis par les entraîneurs. Cela signifie que chaque athlète a un rôle à jouer, petit ou grand, lequel a une incidence sur le résultat. Par conséquent, un athlète qui maîtrise bien son jeu risque fort d’améliorer la performance de l’équipe au complet. Avoir confiance en ses habiletés durant un entraînement réduit les tendances de contrôle et automatise les mouvements. L’assurance à l’égard de la maîtrise des habiletés améliore la précision, l’exécution et la complexité des aptitudes.

Avoir confiance en vos habiletés lors d’une compétition vous permet :
  • de prendre de meilleures décisions, car vous ne douterez pas de vous; 
  • d’avoir recours à de meilleures techniques et à des jeux supérieurs afin d’éviter les erreurs; 
  • de prendre des risques intelligents et calculés et de ne pas suranalyser; 
  • de ne pas penser trop loin et de ne pas vous attarder sur vos erreurs. 
Votre conviction à l’égard de votre capacité de pousser vos limites à la dernière seconde renforce votre assuranceet élimine les doutes. Mais avant de réussir un exploit sans effort, vous devez mettre en pratique vos habiletés en entraînement, avant la compétition. La compétition est l’endroit où vous mettez en œuvre ce que vous avez appris. À mesure que vous pratiquez et développez vos habiletés, vous entretenez votre mémoire musculaire*. Cette dernière vous permet d’exécuter des jeux sans trop penser à vos mouvements.

La confiance envers les habiletés que vous avez apprises et développées durant les entraînements automatise votre performance. Les athlètes qui ont confiance en leur jeu sont habituellement des personnes qui veulent être en contrôle du match lors de situations difficiles. L’assurance qu’ils ont fait en sorte que leur performance ne semble pas nécessiter d’effort.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC: 

1. Curry L, Maniar S. Academic Course for Enhancing Student-Athlete Performance in Sport. Sport Psychologist. September 2004;18(3):297-316.
2. Kruger-Davis M. WHEN I MISS, IS IT SELF DOUBT?. Australian Clay Target Shooting News. August 2013;66(8):18.
3. Moore W, Stevenson J. Understanding Trust in the Performance of Complex Automatic Sport Skills. Sport Psychologist. September 1991;5(3):281-289.
4. Stevenson J, Stephenson P, Hoffman M, Jager T, Vanengen E, Pinter M. Effect of Training for Trust in Putting Performance of Skilled Golfers: A Randomized Controlled Trial. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2, 2007;2(0):67-85.
5. Stevenson J, Moore B, Brossman M, et al. Effects of Trust Training on Tee and Pitch Shots in Golf. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. June 2, 2007;2(0):47-66.
6. Vieira D, Palmer S. The Coaching Skills Self-Efficacy Scale (CSSES): A validation study among a Portuguese sample. Coaching Psychologist. June 2012;8(1):6-11.

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Water Safety

With summer just around the corner, many families will spend those hot days in pools, ponds and lakes, splashing around, having fun and keeping cool. Most children love to play in and around water, so knowing basic water safety is essential to keep you and your family safe this season. 
“Drowning is the leading cause of unintentional death to children ages 1-4” – Safe Kids Worldwide 
 Basic Water Safety tips:
  • Teach your children basic water safety skills. Enroll them in a local swimming program taught by qualified instructors and make sure you know how to swim as well. 
  • Always watch children closely when they are in or near water even if there is a lifeguard present and they know how to swim. This means ponds, lakes, rivers, oceans, and pools as well as spas, toilets and bathtubs. 
  • Avoid entrapment by keeping children away from pool drains, pipes and other openings. 
  • Use lifejackets when in or near open bodies of water or when participating in water sports.
Lifejackets and Life Preservers 

If your family enjoys spending time on the water, make sure everyone wears an approved personal flotation device or lifejacket. Today’s lifejackets have come a long way with improved looks, comfort, and protection. Ensure that the lifejackets you choose for you and your family fit snugly and work for each person’s height, weight and fitness levels. You can find lifejackets that are tailor made for specific activities - choose the lifejacket that best fits your needs.

Lifejackets are designed to keep you afloat in the water in order to give you extra time for people to rescue you. It’s sobering to know that it only takes 60 seconds for an adult to drown, and 20 seconds for a child to drown, so it’s important to make sure you have a lifejacket that’s secure, well-fitted and suited to your activity.

Swimming Lessons 

Knowing how to swim is an essential life skill and children should learn either by taking swimming lessons or have a parent teach them. Keep in mind that children develop at different rates and each child will be ready to swim in their own time. Before starting swimming lessons for younger children you may need to factor in their frequency of exposure to water, emotional maturity, physical limitations, and health concerns related to swimming pools (for example, swallowing water, infections and pool chemicals).

Swimming and playing in water is a great family activity, but be smart – know the rules and enforce them, wear a well fitted lifejacket and make sure everyone knows how to swim. Water is amazing but it can also be dangerous, be safe and have fun this summer!

References from the SIRC Collection: 

1. Avramidis S, Butterly R, Llewellyn D. Under What Circumstances Do People Drown? Encoding the Fourth Component of the 4W Model. International Journal Of Aquatic Research & Education. November 2009;3(4):406-421. 
2. Martinez C, Stopka C. Using the American Red Cross GuardStart Program to Teach Basic Water Safety Skills to Students with Disabilities. Palaestra. Fall2007 2007;23(4):37-42. 
3. McCool J, Ameratunga S, Moran K, Robinson E. Taking a Risk Perception Approach to Improving Beach Swimming Safety. International Journal Of Behavioral Medicine. December 2009;16(4):360-366. 
4. Moran K. Watching Parents, Watching Kids: Water Safety Supervision of Young Children at the Beach. International Journal Of Aquatic Research & Education. August 2010;4(3):269-277. 
5. Stallman R, Kjendlie P. A Proposed Framework for Developing a Plan for Research in Lifesaving and Water Safety. International Journal Of Aquatic Research & Education. February 2008;2(1):78-84. 
6. Witman G. Injury Rates During Water-Based Wilderness Recreation. International Journal Of Aquatic Research & Education. May 2007;1(2):134-144.