Thursday, July 31, 2014

Active Recovery

Recovery is paramount to attaining peak performance and minimizing the chances of overtraining. For athletes who carry out repeated bouts of high intensity workouts, the ability to recover between the repetitions and the days between these sessions can improve performance. Being able to recover quickly allows the athlete to apply more stress during training and to do so more frequently during the training cycle.

One method, which has been proven to be effective, is active recovery. Active recovery is exercising at low intensity between bouts of high intensity workouts or on the day after a hard workout. Active recovery has been shown to reduce lactate levels and acidosis. An active recovery day after a hard day of training can also be beneficial as it helps build aerobic fitness. You can incorporate it by jogging, swimming, cycling etc., but remember to keep the intensity low.

A study that had runners using swimming as an active recovery method concluded that athletes performed better the following day and experienced reduced inflammation. Another study on rugby players after a match found that low intensity exercise helped the athletes recover psychologically as it enhanced relaxation.

When to use active recovery:
  • During training while doing repetitions such as swimming intervals or between weights. 
  • Within the training day between workouts or competitions. 
  • Within the training week between training and competition. 
  • Within a training cycle, incorporate easier workouts.
Active recovery can help athletes recover physically and psychologically; it can also aid in building aerobic fitness while still recovering, so long as the intensity is low. Recovering from intense workouts is as important as the workout itself. If your body is able to recover properly, it will be better able to handle the workload and intensity, thus enhancing your ability to train or compete at your best.

References from the SIRC Collection:


1. Arazi H, Mosavi S, Basir S, Karam M. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT RECOVERY CONDITIONS ON BLOOD LACTATE CONCENTRATION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL VARIABLES AFTER HIGH INTENSITY EXERCISE IN HANDBALL PLAYERS. / UČINAK RAZLIČITIH UVJETA OPORAVKA NA KONCENTRACIJU LAKTATA I FIZIOLOŠKE VARIJABLE NAKON VISOKOG INTENZITETA VJEŽBANJA RUKOMETAŠA. Sport Science. December 2012;5(2):13-17.
2. Ben Abderrahman A, Zouhal H, Prioux J, et al. Effects of recovery mode (active vs. passive) on performance during a short high-intensity interval training program: a longitudinal study. European Journal Of Applied Physiology. June 2013;113(6):1373-1383.
3. KARTHIKEYAN G, SINHA AKHOURY G, SANDHU JASPAL S. Effect of active arm exercise and passive rest in physiological recovery after high-intensity exercises. Biology Of Exercise. January 2013;9(1):9-23.
4. Koizumi K, Fujita Y, Muramatsu S, Manabe M, Ito M, Nomura J. Active recovery effects on local oxygenation level during intensive cycling bouts. Journal Of Sports Sciences . June 2011;29(9):919-926.
5. Lopes F, Panissa V, Julio U, Menegon E, Franchini E. The Effect of Active Recovery on Power Performance During the Bench Press Exercise. Journal Of Human Kinetics. March 2014;40:161-169.
6. Mazreno A, Nodoushan I, Hajian N. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE RECOVERY AFTER INCREMENTAL EXERCISE TO EXHAUSTION ON SERUM TESTOSTERONE AND PROGESTERONE LEVELS OF ATHLETES. / USPOREDBA UČINAKA AKTIVNOG I PASIVNOG OPORAVKA NAKON STUPNJEVITOG OPTEREĆIVANJA DO ISCRPLJENJA NA SERUM TESTOSTERONA I PROGESTERONA U KRVI SPORTAŠA. Sport Science. June 2013;6(1):28-32.

Récupération active

La récupération est primordiale pour livrer une performance optimale et réduire les risques de surentraînement. Les athlètes qui suivent de courts entraînements à grande intensité ont une capacité de récupération accrue entre les séances et durant les jours d’inactivité, ce qui peut améliorer la performance globale. Récupérer rapidement permet à l’athlète d’accroître ses efforts durant l’entraînement et de le faire plus souvent durant un cycle d’entraînement.

Une méthode efficace éprouvée est la récupération active. Celle-ci consiste à s’entraîner à faible intensité entre des séances d’entraînement intenses ou le lendemain d’un entraînement ardu. Il a été démontré que la récupération active réduit le niveau de lactate et d’acidose. Une journée de récupération active le lendemain d’une dure journée d’entraînement peut aussi être bénéfique, car elle renforce la capacité aérobique. Vous pouvez intégrer ce processus lorsque vous faites du jogging, de la natation, du vélo, etc., mais n’oubliez pas de garder l’intensité faible.

Dans le cadre d’une étude, des coureurs ont eu recours à la natation comme méthode de récupération active*, et les conclusions étaient que ces athlètes ont livré une meilleure performance le lendemain et ont connu une inflammation moindre de leurs muscles. Une autre étude visant des joueurs de rugby a démontré que faire de l’exercice à faible intensité après une partie aide les athlètes à récupérer sur le plan psychologique*, puisque l’état de relaxation est accru.

Quand avoir recours à la récupération active
  • Lors d’un entraînement qui implique des répétitions, comme la natation à intervalles ou l’haltérophilie. 
  • Durant la journée d’entraînement, entre des séances ou des compétitions. 
  • Durant la semaine d’entraînement, également entre des séances ou des compétitions. 
  • Pendant un cycle d’entraînement, lors de séances d’entraînement peu intensives.
Une récupération active peut aider les athlètes à récupérer sur le plan physique et psychologique. Elle peut aussi contribuer au renforcement de la capacité aérobique, tant et aussi longtemps que l’intensité de l’activité est faible. La récupération suivant un entraînement intense est aussi importante que l’entraînement même. Si votre corps récupère correctement, il sera plus en mesure de gérer la charge de travail et l’intensité, ce qui améliorera votre capacité à vous entraîner ou à performer au meilleur de votre forme.

* Seulement disponible en anglais 
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Arazi H, Mosavi S, Basir S, Karam M. THE EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT RECOVERY CONDITIONS ON BLOOD LACTATE CONCENTRATION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL VARIABLES AFTER HIGH INTENSITY EXERCISE IN HANDBALL PLAYERS. / UČINAK RAZLIČITIH UVJETA OPORAVKA NA KONCENTRACIJU LAKTATA I FIZIOLOŠKE VARIJABLE NAKON VISOKOG INTENZITETA VJEŽBANJA RUKOMETAŠA. Sport Science. December 2012;5(2):13-17.
2. Ben Abderrahman A, Zouhal H, Prioux J, et al. Effects of recovery mode (active vs. passive) on performance during a short high-intensity interval training program: a longitudinal study. European Journal Of Applied Physiology. June 2013;113(6):1373-1383.
3. KARTHIKEYAN G, SINHA AKHOURY G, SANDHU JASPAL S. Effect of active arm exercise and passive rest in physiological recovery after high-intensity exercises. Biology Of Exercise. January 2013;9(1):9-23.
4. Koizumi K, Fujita Y, Muramatsu S, Manabe M, Ito M, Nomura J. Active recovery effects on local oxygenation level during intensive cycling bouts. Journal Of Sports Sciences . June 2011;29(9):919-926.
5. Lopes F, Panissa V, Julio U, Menegon E, Franchini E. The Effect of Active Recovery on Power Performance During the Bench Press Exercise. Journal Of Human Kinetics. March 2014;40:161-169.
6 .Mazreno A, Nodoushan I, Hajian N. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF ACTIVE AND PASSIVE RECOVERY AFTER INCREMENTAL EXERCISE TO EXHAUSTION ON SERUM TESTOSTERONE AND PROGESTERONE LEVELS OF ATHLETES. / USPOREDBA UČINAKA AKTIVNOG I PASIVNOG OPORAVKA NAKON STUPNJEVITOG OPTEREĆIVANJA DO ISCRPLJENJA NA SERUM TESTOSTERONA I PROGESTERONA U KRVI SPORTAŠA. Sport Science. June 2013;6(1):28-32.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Summer Safety: Preventing Heat Illness

Heat illness is a broad term that encompasses several conditions, ranging from mild heat cramps to heat stroke. Heat illness is typically caused by a combination of hot environment, strenuous exercise, inadequate adaptation to the heat, age, hydration levels and/or a poor choice of clothing. It’s always a risk in summer sports, particularly football and running.

Many factors can contribute to a person experiencing heat illness:

Acclimation/Environment: The increase in outside temperatures in spring can be problematic for many athletes if they don’t get the opportunity ease into the change. Acclimatization is the process of becoming adjusted to your environment gradually over time. If athletes in training are pushed too hard too fast, there is an increase risk that they will experience some form of heat illness.

Fitness Level/Adaptation: In order to cool the body the heart needs to pump harder to get the blood to flow out to the skin. If you are overweight or have a low fitness level, extreme heat can be an added strain on the cardiovascular system even without adding exercise into the mix. So if you decide to start training in the spring and summer, allow your body ample time to adapt to the exercise as well as the changing conditions.

Age: As we age, we do not adjust as well to sudden changes in temperature. Elderly people are also more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes the normal body responses to heat or medication that alters their body’s ability to adapt to extreme heat. Older adults can protect themselves from heat illness by avoiding strenuous exercise during the hottest parts of the day, seeking air-conditioned environments, or taking a cool shower or bath.

Dehydration: On average, we lose about three litres of water each day through perspiration, urine and respiration. When you add a workout in on a hot day, you can quickly see how replenishing your body’s water becomes even more necessary. Even mild levels of dehydration (3-5% of body weight) can hurt athletic performance. How do you know if you are drinking enough? A good sign of hydration is the output of large volumes of clear, dilute urine.

Clothing: Loose, lightweight material allows for better air circulation and facilitates evaporation of sweat. Clothing should be lightweight, light-coloured, and loose-fitting such as cotton or a wicking fabric; avoid dark, non-breathing synthetic clothing.

Symptoms of heat stress may include:
  • normal or elevated body temperature 
  • body rash 
  • profuse sweating 
  • fast, shallow breathing and/or a fast, weak pulse 
  • heat cramps, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea 
  • exhaustion, headache, dizziness, weakness, or fainting 
Heat injury is preventable and prevention begins with understanding the causes of heat illness. Knowing the signs of heat injury will reduce the number of potential injuries and allow you to train and exercise safely during the summer.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Crandall C, González-Alonso J. Cardiovascular function in the heat-stressed human. Acta Physiologica. August 2010;199(4):407-423. 
2. Johnson E, Kolkhorst F, Richburg A, Schmitz A, Martinez J, Armstrong L. Specific Exercise Heat Stress Protocol for a Triathlete's Return from Exertional Heat Stroke. Current Sports Medicine Reports (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). March 2013;12(2):106-109. 
3. LAROSE J, WRIGHT H, SIGAL R, BOULAY P, HARDCASTLE S, KENNY G. Do Older Females Store More Heat than Younger Females during Exercise in the Heat?. Medicine & Science In Sports & Exercise. December 2013;45(12):2265-2276. 
4. Roberts W. Heat stress and athletic participation. International Sportmed Journal. June 2008;9(2):67-73. Schlader Z, Stannard S, Mündel T. Exercise and heat stress: performance, fatigue and exhaustion—a hot topic. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. January 2011;45(1):3-5. 
5. Tsukasa I, Naoyuki H. Effects of Heat Stress on Ocular Blood Flow during Exhaustive Exercise. Journal Of Sports Science & Medicine. March 2014;13(1):172-179. 
6. YAMAZAKI F. Importance of Heat Acclimation in the Prevention of Heat Illness during Sports Activity and Work. Advances In Exercise & Sports Physiology. November 2012;18(3):53-59.

Sécurité durant l’été : prévenir les maladies liées à la chaleur

Les maladies liées à la chaleur* englobent plusieurs conditions, variant de légères crampes de chaleur à des coups de chaleur graves. Ces maladies sont habituellement attribuables à une combinaison de plusieurs éléments, notamment un environnement chaud, de l’exercice ardu, une adaptation inadéquate à la chaleur, l’âge, le niveau d’hydratation et le mauvais choix d’habillement. Les sports d’été, particulièrement le football et la course, présentent toujours des risques relativement aux maladies liées à la chaleur.

De nombreux facteurs font en sorte qu’une personne peut souffrir de ce type de maladie.

Acclimatation/Environnement : L’augmentation de la température extérieure durant le printemps peut poser problème à de nombreux athlètes s’ils n’ont pas l’occasion de s’habituer aux changements. L’acclimatation* est le processus qui vous permet de vous ajuster graduellement à votre environnement au fil du temps. Si les athlètes dépassent trop leurs limites lors d’un entraînement, ils courent un risque accru d’attraper une maladie liée à la chaleur.

Niveau de forme physique/Adaptation* : Pour que le corps se refroidisse, le cœur doit pomper plus de sang dans tout le corps. Si vous faites de l’embonpoint ou n’êtes pas très en forme, une chaleur extrême peut ajouter une tension sur le système cardiovasculaire, même si vous ne faites pas plus d’exercice que d’habitude. Alors si vous commencez à vous entraîner au printemps ou à l’été, laissez assez de temps à votre corps de s’adapter à l’exercice et aux changements de condition.

Âge : En vieillissant, notre corps s’adapte de moins en moins bien aux changements de température soudains. Les personnes âgées* sont plus susceptibles d’avoir une maladie chronique qui change les réponses normales du corps à la chaleur ou de prendre des médicaments qui ont une incidence sur la capacité du corps à s’adapter à la chaleur extrême. Les adultes âgés peuvent prévenir les maladies liées à la chaleur en évitant de faire de l’exercice ardu lors des moments les plus chauds de la journée, en restant dans des endroits climatisés ou en prenant une douche ou un bain froid.

Déshydratation* : En moyenne, nous perdons environ trois litres d’eau chaque jour par l’entremise de la perspiration, de l’urine et de la respiration. Ajoutez à cela un entraînement lors d’une journée chaude et vous constaterez rapidement qu’il est plus que nécessaire de réhydrater votre corps. Même une légère déshydratation (de 3 à 5 pour cent du poids de votre corps) peut nuire à la performance athlétique. Comment savoir si vous buvez assez d’eau? Un signe d’une bonne hydratation est une vaste quantité d’urine claire et diluée.

Habillement : Un tissu ample et léger permet une circulation d’air optimale et facilite l’évaporation de la sueur. Il est recommandé de porter des vêtements* légers, amples et de couleurs pâles, comme le coton ou le tissu mèche. Évitez de porter des vêtements foncés ou synthétiques qui ne permettent pas à votre corps de respirer.

Symptômes du stress lié à la chaleur :
  • Température corporelle normale ou élevée 
  • Rougeurs sur le corps 
  • Sueur abondante 
  • Respirations rapides et peu profondes ou pouls rapide et faible 
  • Crampes de chaleur, nausées, vomissements ou diarrhée 
  • Épuisements, maux de tête, étourdissements, faiblesses ou pertes de connaissance 
Les blessures liées à la chaleur peuvent être évitées, et la prévention* commence en comprenant les causes de ce type de maladie. Reconnaître les signes d’une maladie liée à la chaleur réduira les risques de blessure tout en vous permettant de vous entraîner et de faire de l’exercice de façon sécuritaire durant l’été.

* Seulement disponible en anglais 
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Crandall C, González-Alonso J. Cardiovascular function in the heat-stressed human. Acta Physiologica. August 2010;199(4):407-423. 
2. Johnson E, Kolkhorst F, Richburg A, Schmitz A, Martinez J, Armstrong L. Specific Exercise Heat Stress Protocol for a Triathlete's Return from Exertional Heat Stroke. Current Sports Medicine Reports (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). March 2013;12(2):106-109. 
3. LAROSE J, WRIGHT H, SIGAL R, BOULAY P, HARDCASTLE S, KENNY G. Do Older Females Store More Heat than Younger Females during Exercise in the Heat?. Medicine & Science In Sports & Exercise. December 2013;45(12):2265-2276. 
4. Roberts W. Heat stress and athletic participation. International Sportmed Journal. June 2008;9(2):67-73. Schlader Z, Stannard S, Mündel T. Exercise and heat stress: performance, fatigue and exhaustion—a hot topic. British Journal Of Sports Medicine. January 2011;45(1):3-5. 
5. Tsukasa I, Naoyuki H. Effects of Heat Stress on Ocular Blood Flow during Exhaustive Exercise. Journal Of Sports Science & Medicine. March 2014;13(1):172-179. 
6. YAMAZAKI F. Importance of Heat Acclimation in the Prevention of Heat Illness during Sports Activity and Work. Advances In Exercise & Sports Physiology. November 2012;18(3):53-59.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Active mothers = Active kids

Being physically active has many benefits such as controlling risk factors for heart disease, managing stress and generally improving our quality of life. In recent years, childhood obesity, a key predictor of obesity in adulthood continues to increase. This health issue has garnered a significant amount of attention from the Canadian government and health care officials and the attention is not unwarranted. In 2011, the BMI of youth ages 12-17 indicated that 24% of boys and 17% of girls were overweight or obese.

Childhood obesity can lead to:
  • Heart disease 
  • Type-2 diabetes 
  • Depression
  • Low self –esteem 
  • Being bullied 
The Canadian Food Guide is a campaign to educate parents and children on how to eat properly and the Canadian Physical Activity Guide includes strategies to assist Canadians in getting more active. Following these guides is a great way to seek out a healthy lifestyle in the fight against childhood obesity.

Although these guides are great examples, there is also plenty of research to broaden the picture. One such study released in the Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics investigated the activity levels of mothers and their preschool children. The study tracked the physical activity of 554 mothers and their 4-year-olds. They concluded that children in the study were moderately or vigorously active when their mother followed an active lifestyle. However, it was not clear whether the mother influenced the child or if the child’s playfulness influenced the mother.

Getting a mother and child involved in promoting physical health can lead to better overall health. Parental and sibling support has also been shown to have an influence on the physical activity behavior of children and can encourage the whole family to get active.

References from the SIRC Collection:


1. Greendorfer S, Lewko J. Role of family members in sport socialization of children. Research Quarterly. May 1978;49(2):146-152.
2. Kusy K, Osinski W. Relationship between children's exercise and the perceived influences of significant others. Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis. 2001;6(Suppl):140-143.
3. Lewko J, Greendorfer S. Family influences in sport socialization of children and adolescents. 1988;
Mothers Today Less Physically Active Than 1960s Moms. Physical Therapy. March 2, 2014;:10.
4. Olvera N, Smith D, Kellam S, et al. Comparing High and Low Acculturated Mothers and Physical Activity in Hispanic Children. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. September 2, 2011;8:S206-S213.
5. Pahkala K, Heinonen O, Lagström H, Hakala P, Sillanmäki L, Simell O. Leisure-time physical activity of 13-year-old adolescents. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. August 2007;17(4):324-330.

Mères actives, enfants actifs

Être actif physiquement procure de nombreux avantages, comme contrôler les facteurs de risque relatifs aux maladies cardiaques, gérer le stress et améliorer la qualité de vie en général. Au cours des dernières années, le taux d’obésité chez les enfants, un facteur de prévision de l’obésité adulte, a augmenté sans cesse. Ce problème de santé a beaucoup suscité l’attention du gouvernement canadien et des responsables des soins de santé, et avec raison. En 2011, l’IMC des jeunes âgés de 12 à 17 ans indiquait que 24 % des garçons et 17 % des filles souffraient d’embonpoint ou d’obésité.

L’obésité chez les enfants peut entraîner :
  • des maladies cardiaques; 
  • un diabète de type 2; 
  • de la dépression; 
  • une faible estime de soi; 
  • l’intimidation. 
Le Guide alimentaire canadien vise à sensibiliser les parents et les enfants à l’égard d’une bonne alimentation, et le Guide canadien de l’activité physique présente des stratégies pour aider la population canadienne à être plus active. Suivre les conseils de ces guides vous permettra d’avoir un mode de vie actif et de combattre l’obésité chez les enfants.

Bien que ces documents soient d’excellents exemples, bon nombre de recherches donnent aussi un aperçu global de la situation. Une étude publiée dans le Journal of the American Academy of Pediatricss’est penchée sur le niveau d’activité de mères et de leurs enfants d’âge préscolaire, en surveillant les activités physiques de 554 mères et de leurs enfants de quatre ans. L’étude a conclu que ces enfants étaient actifs de façon modérée ou intense lorsque leur mère suivait un mode de vie actif. Cependant, il n’a pas été possible de déterminer si les mères influençaient le comportement de leur enfant ou si la gaieté des enfants influençait les mères.

Quoi qu’il en soit, l’activité physique d’une mère et de ses enfants mène à une meilleure santé globale. Il est aussi prouvé que le soutien des parentset des frères et sœurs a une incidence sur le comportement des enfants relativement à l’activité physique et peut inciter toute la famille à être active.

* Seulement disponible en anglais 
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Greendorfer S, Lewko J. Role of family members in sport socialization of children. Research Quarterly. May 1978;49(2):146-152.
2. Kusy K, Osinski W. Relationship between children's exercise and the perceived influences of significant others. Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis. 2001;6(Suppl):140-143.
3. Lewko J, Greendorfer S. Family influences in sport socialization of children and adolescents. 1988;
Mothers Today Less Physically Active Than 1960s Moms. Physical Therapy. March 2, 2014;:10.
4. Olvera N, Smith D, Kellam S, et al. Comparing High and Low Acculturated Mothers and Physical Activity in Hispanic Children. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. September 2, 2011;8:S206-S213.
5. Pahkala K, Heinonen O, Lagström H, Hakala P, Sillanmäki L, Simell O. Leisure-time physical activity of 13-year-old adolescents. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. August 2007;17(4):324-330.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

2014 Commonwealth Games

July 23, 2014 marks the official opening of the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Scotland. The Commonwealth Games are a tradition that started in in Hamilton, Ontario in 1930 where 11 countries had 400 athletes take part in 6 sports and 59 events. Since its inception, the Games have been held every four years (except in 1942 and 1946 because of WWII), and has grown into the third largest multi-sport event in the world.

The Commonwealth Games stands out for its relaxed atmosphere, the unique characteristic of having one common language, English and is frequently referred to as ‘the Friendly Games’. This year the event will host 70 different nations and include 17 sports with 261 medal events as well as offering a record 22 para-sport medal events.

The Queen’s Baton Relay is a tradition that was introduced in 1958 and invites everyone to get involved in the excitement leading up to the event. For the Glasgow games, the Relay will include 4,000 torchbearers and will cover 190,000 km.

While the athletes are at their physical peak, the closer the Games get, the more important mental skills become as participants get ready to compete at an elite level. With so many talented people in one place sometimes winning and losing can come down to whether or not an athlete can keep it together under pressure. With over 6,000 athletes and officials participating and over 1 million visitors to the city, there is no doubt that this Games will be an exciting one to watch.

Jeux du Commonwealth 2014

Le 23 juillet 2014 marquera l’ouverture officielle des Jeux du Commonwealth, à Glasgow, en Écosse*. Ces Jeux sont une tradition qui a commencé en 1930, à Hamilton (Ontario), où 400 athlètes provenant de 11 pays ont participé à 59 épreuves regroupant six sports différents. Depuis cette époque, les Jeux ont eu lieu tous les quatre ans (sauf en 1942 et 1946 en raison de la Seconde Guerre mondiale) et représentent le troisième événement multisports en importance au monde.

Les Jeux du Commonwealth, qu’on appelle bien souvent les « Jeux amicaux », se démarquent par leur ambiance détendue et par l’unique caractéristique de n’avoir qu’une seule langue courante, soit l’anglais. Cette année, l’événement accueillera 70 pays qui tenteront de décrocher des médailles dans le cadre de 261 épreuves et 17 sports, en plus de présenter un nouveau sommet de 22 épreuves de sports paralympiques.

On compte aussi le relais du bâton de la Reine*, une tradition introduite en 1958 qui invite toute la population à participer aux festivités qui précèdent l’événement. Dans le cadre des Jeux de Glasgow, le relais comprendra 4 000 porteurs de bâton sur une distance de 190 000 kilomètres.

Bien que les athlètes soient au sommet de leur forme physique, plus les Jeux approchent, plus les capacités mentales des participants deviennent importantes, puisqu’ils se produiront à un niveau élite. Avec autant d’athlètes talentueux regroupés en un seul endroit, la victoire ou la défaite peut parfois se jouer en fonction de la capacité des athlètes à bien gérer la pression. Il n’y a aucun doute que les Jeux de cette année seront des plus spectaculaires, avec plus de 6 000 athlètes et officiels et un million de visiteurs présents dans la ville.

* Seulement disponible en anglais 

Thursday, July 17, 2014

What do the different jerseys at the Tour de France mean?

The Tour de France is the most prestigious event in all of cycling. The 2014 edition will lead riders through 21 stages, covering 3,664 kilometers. For each competitor, the goal is to be the rider wearing the yellow jersey, le maillot jaune, after crossing the line on the Champs-Élysées in Paris on the final day.

Though the most coveted jersey is the maillot jaune claimed by the overall winner, there are other jerseys to be won during the event; in other words, there are races within the race.

Yellow jersey (maillot jaune)
This jersey is given to the rider who completes the race with the fastest overall time. The winner has to have the ability to time trial, climb and be able to handle the pace set by the peloton on each stage. This is the most sought out jersey and the one every rider dreams of wearing at the end of the overall race. The 2013 winner was Chris Froome of Team Sky.

Green jersey (maillot vert)
The rider who wins the race points competition, usually a sprinter, wins the green jersey. Points are given to the first 15 riders to cross the line on a sliding scale on stages and intermediate sprints. On flat stages the winner collects 45 points, 30 points on medium mountain stages, and 20 points on high mountain and individual time trial stages. Points are also given during intermediate sprints, with 20 points awarded to the winner down to 1 point for the 15th-placed rider. The rider who consistently finishes highest each day accumulates the most green jersey points. Peter Sagan from the Cannondale team won the green jersey in 2013.

Polka-Dot Jersey
The rider who accumulates the most points from the different climb categories wins this jersey. These riders are known as the “King of the Mountain” (KOM), as the winner is usually a pure climber. Climbs are divided into 4 categories, with a category 1 climb being the most difficult and 4 being mild. A Hors climb is a fifth category that is classified to be even more difficult than a category 1 climb; an example would be Alpe D’Huez. The 2013 winner was Nairo Quintana of the Movistar Team.

White Jersey
The white jersey is awarded to the best young rider with lowest overall time. This year it will be awarded to the rider who was under the age of 25 before January 1, 2014. This jersey was also awarded to Nairo Quintana in 2013.

Every team is there to win the maillot jaune but only one rider will get the privilege to wear that jersey at the conclusion of stage 21. The Tour de France takes place from July 5 to 27 with the first stage starting in the United Kingdom, between the cities of Leeds and Harrogate. The different jerseys add intrigue and excitement to the race as they bring another dimension to the competition.


References from the SIRC Collection:


1. BAČÍK V, KLOBUČNÍK M. History of Tour de France from the Geographical Point of View. Sport Science Review. June 2013;22(3/4):255-277.
2. Kennedy B. Yellow Jersey Contenders. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):52-56.
3. King of the Mountain. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):62.
4. Rogge N, Van Reeth D, Van Puyenbroeck T. Performance Evaluation of Tour de France Cycling Teams Using Data Envelopment Analysis. International Journal Of Sport Finance. August 2013;8(3):236-257.
5. Santalla A, Earnest C, Marroyo J, Lucia A. The Tour de France: An Updated Physiological Review. International Journal Of Sports Physiology & Performance. September 2012;7(3):200-209.
6. The Race for Green. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):56-60.

Que représentent les divers maillots portés lors du Tour de France?

Le Tour de France est l’événement le plus prestigieux en cyclisme. L’édition de 2014 mettra les cyclistes à l’épreuve dans le cadre de 21 étapes qui totalisent 3 664 kilomètres. Chaque compétiteur a comme objectif de porter le maillot jaune après avoir traversé le fil d’arrivée dans les Champs-Élysées de Paris, lors de la dernière journée.

Bien que le maillot le plus convoité soit le maillot jaune décerné au grand gagnant, d’autres maillots peuvent aussi être gagnés durant l’événement. Autrement dit, il y a des courses parmi la grande course!

Maillot jaune 
Ce maillot est décerné au cycliste qui termine la course avec le meilleur temps cumulatif. Le gagnant doit être apte à participer à des courses contre la montre, à monter des pentes et à garder le rythme du pelotonà chaque étape. C’est le maillot le plus convoité qui fait rêver chaque cycliste lors de l’épreuve. Le gagnant de 2013 était Chris Froomede l’équipe Sky.

Maillot vert 
Le cycliste qui remporte la compétition de points, habituellement un sprinteur, reçoit le maillot vert. Les points sont attribués selon un barème aux 15 premiers cyclistes qui traversent la ligne à chaque étape et lors des sprints intermédiaires. Lors des étapes sur surface plate, le gagnant récolte 45 points; lors des étapes montagneuses moyennes, 30 points lui sont accordés; et lors des étapes montagneuses ardues et des courses contre la montre, 20 points lui sont donnés. Des points sont aussi attribués aux 15 premiers cyclistes lors des sprints intermédiaires, dont 20 au premier et un au 15e cycliste. Le compétiteur qui compte de bons résultats au classement cumule des points en vue de remporter le maillot vert. Celui-ci a été remporté par Peter Sagande l’équipe Cannondale en 2013.

Maillot à pois*
Le cycliste qui accumule le plus de points dans les diverses catégories d’épreuves à pentes gagne ce maillot. Les cyclistes qui participent à ce type d’épreuve sont appelés les « rois de la montagne », puisque le gagnant est habituellement un grimpeur. Les pentes sont divisées en quatre catégories*, 1 étant la plus difficile et 4 la plus facile. La classe « hors catégorie » est un cinquième type d’épreuve qui est encore plus difficile que le type 1; l’Alpe D’Huez en est un exemple. Nairo Quintana*, de l’équipe Movistar, a remporté le maillot à pois en 2013.

Maillot blanc
Le maillot blanc est attribué au cycliste de moins de 25 ans qui compte le meilleur temps cumulatif. Cette année, les cyclistes admissibles sont ceux ayant moins de 25 ans au 1er janvier 2014. Ce maillot a aussi été décerné à Nairo Quintana en 2013.

Chaque équipe se présente sur la piste dans le but de gagner le maillot jaune, mais seulement un cycliste a le privilège de le porter à la fin de la 21e étape. Le Tour de France a lieu du 5 au 27 juillet 2014, et la première étape se tient au Royaume-Uni entre les villes de Leeds et Harrogate. La course aux divers maillots* ajoute un suspense et de l’engouement aux épreuves et permet aux partisans de profiter de cet aspect particulier du spectacle.

* Seulement disponible en anglais 
Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. BAČÍK V, KLOBUČNÍK M. History of Tour de France from the Geographical Point of View. Sport Science Review. June 2013;22(3/4):255-277.
2. Kennedy B. Yellow Jersey Contenders. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):52-56.
3. King of the Mountain. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):62.
4. Rogge N, Van Reeth D, Van Puyenbroeck T. Performance Evaluation of Tour de France Cycling Teams Using Data Envelopment Analysis. International Journal Of Sport Finance. August 2013;8(3):236-257.
5. Santalla A, Earnest C, Marroyo J, Lucia A. The Tour de France: An Updated Physiological Review. International Journal Of Sports Physiology & Performance. September 2012;7(3):200-209.
6. The Race for Green. Bicycling Australia. July 2008;(152):56-60.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

The Power of Sport

Sport for development refers to any initiative that uses sport to help improve or strengthen its community or helps assist people in need. However, when people talk about sport for development they are often referring to organizations like Right to Play and UNICEF who work in developing countries all over the world. What is often overlooked is the work being done locally in the sport for development movement.

The J. W. McConnell Foundation is a strong believer in the Sport for development movement in Canada; they currently support multiple organizations with the vision of promoting healthy lifestyles and helping vulnerable individuals and communities. Sport Matters Group (SMG), which is one of the McConnell Foundation grant recipients, is hosting three regional Sport for Development gatherings (Halifax, Toronto, Vancouver) leading up to their National gathering (Ottawa). These gatherings look to bring together leaders and innovators in the field of sport for development in order to share ideas and find ways to advance the movement.

Examples of sport for development:

SMG’s Sport4Change website helps to highlight some of the amazing work being done across this country by different organizations and individuals. These stories include: 
  • Night Hoops – A non-profit organization that provides late-night basketball programs for at-risk youth. 
  • MoreSports – Provides sustainable sport and physical activity opportunities for children and families. 
  • Sport Nova Scotia Youth Leadership Program – Youth facing barriers to employment are provided with skills training and on-the-job experience. 
  • And many, many more 
While programs like Right to Play do amazing work, reaching one million children across the world, it is important not to overlook the benefits sport can provide locally to improve our communities in Canada.

Here are just a few of the ways sport can have a positive impact on a community:
  • Healthy living – Sport participation is known to have numerous health benefits
  • Safety – By promoting positive values sport programs have been shown to yield significant reductions in crime
  • Inclusion – Sport programs can help make communities more inclusive to individuals with disabilities. 
It is because of these benefits that it is important to continue to support and advance the sport for development movement both internationally and locally.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Beacom, A. (2014). Sport for development and peace: a critical sociology. Sport in Society, 17(2), 274-278. 
2. Carreres- Ponsoda, F. et al. (2012). The relationship between out-of-school sport participation and positive youth development. Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 7(3), 671-683. 
3. Darnell, S. C. (2010). Power, Politics and "Sport for Development and Peace": Investigating the Utility of Sport for International Development. Sociology of Sport Journal, 27(1), 54-75. 
4. Holt, N. L. et al. (2012). Physical education and sport programs at an inner city school: exploring possibilities for positive youth development. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy , 17(1), 97-113.
5. Maximizing the Benefits of Youth Sport. (2013). JOPERD: The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation and Dance. 84(7), 8-13 
6. Pink, M., & Cameron, M. (2014). Motivations, Barriers, and the Need to Engage with Community Leaders: Challenges of Establishing a Sport for Development Project in Baucau, East Timor. International Journal of Sport & Society, 4(1), 15-29. 
7. Wilski, M. et al. (2012). Personal development of participants in Special Olympics unified sports teams. Human Movement, 13(3), 271-279.