Thursday, October 31, 2013

Resistance training using your own body weight.

When you walk into most gyms, you will immediately see many different machines and various weight equipment laid out. Each one of these has a specific purpose. As a gym rat, you have the ability to choose between lifting light or heavy weights, based on what you are trying to accomplish in your workout. But sometimes making it to the gym as often as you would like can be difficult or cost more than you can budget. Or it may be that gyms are simply not your thing. If one of these is your dilemma, using your own bodyweight at home or outdoors at the local park can be a great option to be able to incorporate resistance training into your workouts.

Resistance training can help:
  • improve muscle strength,
  • control weight,
  • increase bone density and strength,
  • help prevent injury and
  • tone your body.
It can also be a factor in minimizing chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, back pain, depression and obesity. Bodyweight exercises enable people to workout using natural body movements.

When done correctly and with proper technique, you will be employing functional muscle training that targets multiple muscles at once. Some exercises you might want to consider are:

Squats (single and double leg)
• Lunges
Planks 
• Pushups
• Sit-ups
Calf raises (single and double leg)
Lower back extension or superman

Each of these body weight exercises can be modified to fit your needs. For example there are multiple ways of doing the plank exercises. You can incorporate the 8 minutes abs routine or use a resistance band.

While an important advantage of bodyweight resistance training is in targeting multiple muscles, having the proper technique is crucial in order to gain the maximum benefit and to avoid injury. Body weight training can be done anywhere - whether at home, on vacation or even surrounded by nature. So next time you find yourself feeling anxious about the gym session you have missed or you simply want to incorporate resistance training into your exercise routine, consider bodyweight exercises.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Brubaker E. The Impact of a Six-Week Upper Body Resistance-Training Program Using Arm Bands Versus Body Weight on Upper Body Strength. Virginia Journal. Fall2009 2009;30(2):6-8.
2. Decker J. 6 WEEK SLIMDOWN. Men's Fitness. July 2013;29(7):126-134.
3. Harrison J. Bodyweight Training: A Return To Basics. Strength & Conditioning Journal (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). April 2010;32(2):52-55.
4. Janiszewski P. The perfect pushup -- just another gimmick?. Active Living. January 2010;19(1):13-14.
5. Stoppani J, MERRIT G. NUMBER CRUNCHING. Flex. June 2011;29(6):96.
6. Yaprak Y. THE EFFECTS OF BACK EXTENSION TRAINING ON BACK MUSCLE STRENGTH AND SPINAL RANGE OF MOTION IN YOUNG FEMALES. Biology Of Sport. September 2013;30(3):201-206.

Entraînement contre résistance en utilisant son propre poids corporel

En entrant dans un gymnase, on voit tout de suite divers appareils d’exercice, de musculation et des poids et haltères prêts à être utiliser et, ils ont chacun leur spécificité. Si vous faites partie des habitués des gymnases, vous êtes en mesure de choisir entre des charges légères ou lourdes selon vos objectifs d’entraînement. Mais parfois, pour des raisons économiques ou de temps disponible, il est difficile d’être assidu au gymnase. Et puis, il se peut aussi que vous n’aimiez pas vous retrouver dans un gymnase. Si ce dilemme est le vôtre, vous pouvez utiliser votre propre poids corporelcomme résistance à des fins d’entraînement à domicile ou à l’extérieurdans un parc.

L’entraînement contre résistance contribue:
  • À l’amélioration de la force musculaire 
  • Au contrôle du poids 
  • À l’accroissement de la densité et de la force des os 
  • À la prévention des blessures 
  • À la tonification de l’organisme 
L’entraînement contre résistance est aussi un facteur dans la lutte aux maladies chroniques telles que le diabète, la maladie cardiaque, l’arthrite, le mal de dos, la dépression et l’obésité. Les exercices réalisés en utilisant le poids du corps sont des exercices naturels de déplacement du corps.

Bien exécutés selon une bonne technique, ces exercices s’inscrivent dans l’entraînement musculaire fonctionnel* qui sollicite plus d’un muscle à la fois. Voici des exercices que vous pourriez effectuer :
Chacun de ces exercices sollicitant le poids du corpspeut être modifié au besoin. Par exemple, il y a plusieurs façons de réaliser l’exercice de la planche*. Vous pouvez intégrer à votre séance d’exercices 8 minutes pour abdominauxou vous pouvez utiliser des bandes élastiques*.

Les exercices sollicitant le poids corporel dans une séance d’entraînement contre résistance permettent à plusieurs muscles de se mobiliser, mais il faut une bonne technique pour profiter au maximum de la séance et pour éviter les blessures. On peut réaliser partout les exercices sollicitant le poids corporel – à domicile, en vacances et dans la nature. La prochaine fois que vous vous sentirez coupable d’avoir raté une séance d’exercices au gymnase ou si vous désirez tout simplement ajouter un entraînement contre résistance dans votre séance, pourquoi ne pas essayer les exercices sollicitant le poids corporel?

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Brubaker E. The Impact of a Six-Week Upper Body Resistance-Training Program Using Arm Bands Versus Body Weight on Upper Body Strength. Virginia Journal. Fall2009 2009;30(2):6-8.
2. Decker J. 6 WEEK SLIMDOWN. Men's Fitness. July 2013;29(7):126-134.
3. Harrison J. Bodyweight Training: A Return To Basics. Strength & Conditioning Journal (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins). April 2010;32(2):52-55.
4. Janiszewski P. The perfect pushup -- just another gimmick?. Active Living. January 2010;19(1):13-14.
5. Stoppani J, MERRIT G. NUMBER CRUNCHING. Flex. June 2011;29(6):96.
6. Yaprak Y. THE EFFECTS OF BACK EXTENSION TRAINING ON BACK MUSCLE STRENGTH AND SPINAL RANGE OF MOTION IN YOUNG FEMALES. Biology Of Sport. September 2013;30(3):201-206.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

College Athletes and Depression

There is a common perception that college athletes are tough and should be able to resolve problems that might lead to depression. In fact, just the opposite might be true. Having to handle what is essentially a full-time job and keep up with schoolwork might leave them feeling less well-adjusted than non-athletes. Along with the stigma attached to mental health issues, especially in the sporting world where mental toughness is as valued as physical toughness, it can be difficult for athletes to seek help.
an athlete may have different risk factors for developing depression, such as having an injury or having an athletic career come to end, when compared to non-athletes.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/sportsdoc/Depression-in-athletes-is-it-being-ignored.html#fpIlogxhO5SMITAY.99
an athlete may have different risk factors for developing depression, such as having an injury or having an athletic career come to end, when compared to non-athletes.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/sportsdoc/Depression-in-athletes-is-it-being-ignored.html#fpIlogxhO5SMITAY.99
an athlete may have different risk factors for developing depression, such as having an injury or having an athletic career come to end, when compared to non-athletes.
Read more at http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/sportsdoc/Depression-in-athletes-is-it-being-ignored.html#fpIlogxhO5SMITAY.99

Mood disorders sometimes are called Affective Disorders, but more frequently are simply called “depression.” Common contributors to depression are:
Signs/symptoms of depression include*:
  • Low or sad moods, often with episodes of crying 
  • Irritability or anger
  • Feeling worthless, helpless and hopeless 
  • Eating and sleeping disturbance (reflected in an increase or decrease)
  • A decrease in energy and activity levels with feelings of fatigue or tiredness. 
  • Decreases in concentration, interest and motivation 
  • Social withdrawal or avoidance 
  • Negative thinking 
  • Thoughts of death or suicide. In severe cases, intent to commit suicide with a specific plan, followed by one or more suicide attempts. 
While there is often pressure to get the athlete back to play as soon as possible, it’s important that the athlete’s health and safety remains the highest priority. 
Researchers have found that injured athletes experience clinically significant depression 6 times as often as non-injured athletes.
It's important for parents and coaches to recognize their limitations when trying to help someone with a mood disorder. The best way to help is to be able to recognize the symptoms and refer the athlete to a professional. An athlete will need a good support system in order to recover fully, whether it comes from a coach, family, friends or a therapist.
 *This is by no means an exhaustive list, but is intended as a list of common symptoms.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Gagne M. A DIFFERENT KIND OF PAIN. Sports Illustrated. December 12, 2011;115(23):82.
2. Hart C. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF INJURY. Triathlon Life. Fall2009 2009;12(4):44-45.
3. Maniar S, Chamberlain R, Moore N. Suicide risk is real for student-athletes. NCAA News. November 7, 2005;42(23):4-20.
4. Potera C, Delhagen K. Beat the injury blues. Runner's World. October 1990;25(10):18.

5. Reardon C, Factor R. Sport Psychiatry A Systematic Review of Diagnosis and Medical Treatment of Mental Illness in Athletes. Sports Medicine.
6. Weigand S, Cohen J, Merenstein D. Susceptibility for Depression in Current and Retired Student Athletes. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. May 2013;5(3):263-266.

Athlètes collégiens et dépression

Plusieurs pensent que les athlètes collégiens sont suffisamment solides pour venir à bout des problèmes même ceux pouvant mener à une dépression*. En fait, c’est l’inverse qui pourrait s’avérer juste. Ils ont à composer avec ce qui ressemble à un travail à temps plein en plus de se tenir à jour dans les travaux scolaires : cette situation peut les amener à se sentir moins bien adaptés que les étudiants réguliers. Malheureusement, la santé mentale est encore un sujet tabou, particulièrement dans le monde du sport où la force mentale* prend autant de sens que la force physique; il devient alors difficile pour un athlète de demander de l’aide.

Les troubles de l’humeur* parfois nommés troubles affectifs* sont souvent identifiés comme des manifestations de la dépression. Les facteurs à la source de la dépression sont :
 Les signes/symptômes* de la dépression comprennent** :
  • Tristesse accompagnée souvent d’épisodes de larmes 
  • Irritabilité ou colère 
  • Sentiment d’inutilité, d’impuissance et de désespoir 
  • Troubles de l’appétit* et du sommeil* (trop ou pas assez) 
  • Perte d’énergie et d’entrain avec sensation de fatigue ou d’épuisement 
  • Diminution de la concentration, perte d’intérêt et de motivation 
  • Isolement social ou refus de l’activité sociale 
  • Pensées négatives 
  • Idées de mort ou de suicide*. Dans les cas les plus graves, projet suicidaire selon un plan donné suivi d’une ou de plusieurs tentatives de suicide. 
Même si la pression est forte pour un retour hâtif au jeu, la santé et la sécurité de l’athlète doivent demeurer la priorité. D’après des études, les athlètes victimes d’une blessure présentent en clinique 6 fois plus souvent de symptômes de dépression que les athlètes exempts de blessures.

Les parents et les entraîneurs doivent reconnaître leur limite quand ils viennent en aide à quelqu’un présentant des troubles de l’humeur. La meilleure façon d’aider est de reconnaître les symptômes et d’orienter l’athlète vers un professionnel de la santé mentale. Pour une bonne récupération, l’athlète a besoin d’un solide réseau de soutien incluant l’entraîneur, la famille, les amis et le thérapeute.

* Seulement disponible en anglais
**Cette liste ne se veut pas exhaustive, elle présente seulement les symptômes les plus courants.

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Gagne M. A DIFFERENT KIND OF PAIN. Sports Illustrated. December 12, 2011;115(23):82.
2. Hart C. THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF INJURY. Triathlon Life. Fall2009 2009;12(4):44-45.
3. Maniar S, Chamberlain R, Moore N. Suicide risk is real for student-athletes. NCAA News. November 7, 2005;42(23):4-20.
4. Potera C, Delhagen K. Beat the injury blues. Runner's World. October 1990;25(10):18.
5. Reardon C, Factor R. Sport Psychiatry A Systematic Review of Diagnosis and Medical Treatment of Mental Illness in Athletes. Sports Medicine.
6. Weigand S, Cohen J, Merenstein D. Susceptibility for Depression in Current and Retired Student Athletes. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. May 2013;5(3):263-266.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Early or late specialization?

When you compare today's athletes to those from the past, you will notice that athletes of today tend to train pretty much all year round. Sports have become big business with a lot at stake and for this reason, the days of taking the summer off from playing hockey or any other professional sport and coming to training camp unfit are unheard of nowadays. This is the reality not only at the professional level but also at the developmental stage. Kids are specializing early in sports in order to improve their skills and ability in a particular sport. They are training all year round to become the next Olympian or get that athletic scholarship. But is early specialization the best thing?

Early specialization does have its benefits as it allows children to understand pattern recognition and strategic thinking at an earlier stage. There are also athletes such as Tiger Woods and Andre Agassi who specialized at young ages and who would become phenomenal athletes. The Theory of Deliberate Practice by Ericsson and his colleagues supports early specialization, concluding that the earlier one can begin on focused training, the greater the chance at becoming exceptional in their chosen domain.

Conversely though, early specialization limits the ability of a child to explore other sports and discover whether they have other talents. Early specialization can also increase the risk of overuse injuries at a young age and burnout. The fact is that just because your child specializes early it does not guarantee the child will be a great athlete. Though Wayne Gretzky was a great hockey player even at a young age, it should be noted that he was also good at baseball and running.

Most sport governing bodies have also moved to the long-term athlete development model encouraging girls to begin specializing at age 11 and boys at the age of 12. This type of model challenges the notion of early specialization and supports the idea that children should be able to participate in a variety of activities before specializing.

A study of collegiate soccer players concluded that it did not really make a difference whether they had specialized in soccer or whether they were multisport athlete in order to play in the NCAA.

As a parent, allowing your child to be a multisport athlete ensures that their muscles and bones adapt to different movements, thus avoiding overuse injuries. Introducing children to a number of different sports also enables them to develop other characteristics and positive social interaction with a wide rage of new friends and less pressure, since they are not playing the same sport all year round.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Callender S. The Early Specialization of Youth in Sports. Athletic Training & Sports Health Care: The Journal For The Practicing Clinician. November 2010;2(6):255-257.
2. Côté J, Lidor R, Hackfort D. ISSP POSITION STAND: TO SAMPLE OR TO SPECIALIZE? SEVEN POSTULATES ABOUT YOUTH SPORT ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO CONTINUED PARTICIPATION AND ELITE PERFORMANCE. International Journal Of Sport & Exercise Psychology. March 2009;7(1):7-17.
3. Ford P, Ward P, Hodges N, Williams A. The role of deliberate practice and play in career progression in sport: the early engagement hypothesis. High Ability Studies. June 2009;20(1):65-75.
4. Jenkins S. Leading Article: Digging it out of the Dirt: Ben Hogan, Deliberate Practice and the Secret. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. December 15, 2010;5:1-21.
5. Malina R. Early Sport Specialization: Roots, Effectiveness, Risks. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). November 2010;9(6):364-371.
6. Moesch K, Elbe A, Hauge M, Wikman J. Late specialization: the key to success in centimeters, grams, or seconds (cgs) sports. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. December 2011;21(6):e282-e290.
7. Roberts W. EDITORIAL: Youth Sports: Who's Pushing the Cart?. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). November 2010;9(6):323.

Spécialisation précoce ou tardive?

Les athlètes d’aujourd’hui, comparativement à ceux d’hier, ont tendance à s’entraîner à longueur d’année. Le sport est devenu une grosse entreprise où il y a beaucoup à gagner; de nos jours, il n’est plus question de se reposer pendant l’été de la saison de hockey ou de tout autre sport professionnel et de se présenter au camp d’entraînement en piètre condition physique. Cette exigence s’applique au niveau professionnel ainsi qu’en période de croissance chez les athlètes. Les jeunes se spécialisent très tôt afin d’améliorer leurs habiletés et leurs capacités dans un sport donné. Ils s’entraînent toute l’année pour devenir le prochain Olympien ou obtenir une bourse destinée aux étudiants-athlètes. Toutefois, la spécialisation précoce est-elle avantageuse?

La spécialisation précoce présente des avantages*: elle permet aux enfants de reconnaître à bas âge les scénarios de jeu et de développer une pensée stratégique. Par exemple, Tiger Woods et Andre Agassi se sont spécialisés à bas âge et sont devenus des athlètes extraordinaires. La théorie de la pratique délibéréed’Ericsson et collaborateurs appuie la thèse de la spécialisation précoce selon laquelle plus on se consacre tôt à l’entraînement, plus grandes sont les chances d’exceller dans le domaine retenu.

En revanche, la spécialisation précoce limite la capacité des enfants à explorer les autres sports et à découvrir, le cas échéant, leurs autres talents. La spécialisation précoce peut aussi accroître le risque de blessures dues au surmenageà bas âge et l’épuisement*. De plus, la spécialisation à bas âge n’est pas le seul facteur pour devenir un grand athlète. Wayne Gretzkyétait un joueur de hockey phénoménal à bas âge, mais il faut savoir qu’il était aussi bon au baseball et à la course.

La majorité des organismes de sport ont adopté le modèle du développement à long terme de l’athlète; ils encouragent les filles et les garçons à commencer à se spécialiser à 11 ans et à 12 ans respectivement. Ce modèle conteste donc la thèse de la spécialisation précoce et encourage la participation des enfants à diverses activités avant de songer à la spécialisation.

Une étuderéalisée auprès de joueurs de soccer de niveau collégial conclut qu’on ne peut pas vraiment faire une différence entre les joueurs à spécialisation précoce comparativement à ceux à l’approche multisport pour jouer dans la NCAA.

En permettant à leurs enfants de pratiquer plusieurs sports, les parents font en sorte que les os et les muscles des jeunes s’adaptent à différents mouvements; les enfants évitent ainsi les blessures dues au surmenage. L’apprentissage de différents sports permet aux enfants de développer d’autres caractéristiques et de socialiser d’une façon positive avec un grand nombre de camarades, et ce, sans pression, car ils ne jouent pas au même sport à longueur d’année.
* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Callender S. The Early Specialization of Youth in Sports. Athletic Training & Sports Health Care: The Journal For The Practicing Clinician. November 2010;2(6):255-257.
2. Côté J, Lidor R, Hackfort D. ISSP POSITION STAND: TO SAMPLE OR TO SPECIALIZE? SEVEN POSTULATES ABOUT YOUTH SPORT ACTIVITIES THAT LEAD TO CONTINUED PARTICIPATION AND ELITE PERFORMANCE. International Journal Of Sport & Exercise Psychology. March 2009;7(1):7-17.
3. Ford P, Ward P, Hodges N, Williams A. The role of deliberate practice and play in career progression in sport: the early engagement hypothesis. High Ability Studies. June 2009;20(1):65-75.
4. Jenkins S. Leading Article: Digging it out of the Dirt: Ben Hogan, Deliberate Practice and the Secret. International Journal Of Sports Science & Coaching. December 15, 2010;5:1-21.
5. Malina R. Early Sport Specialization: Roots, Effectiveness, Risks. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). November 2010;9(6):364-371.
6. Moesch K, Elbe A, Hauge M, Wikman J. Late specialization: the key to success in centimeters, grams, or seconds (cgs) sports. Scandinavian Journal Of Medicine & Science In Sports. December 2011;21(6):e282-e290.
7. Roberts W. EDITORIAL: Youth Sports: Who's Pushing the Cart?. Current Sports Medicine Reports (American College Of Sports Medicine). November 2010;9(6):323.

Tuesday, October 22, 2013

Special Olympics: Helping Build a Community

by Trent Weir 
Algonquin College Sport Business Management Intern

Special Olympics Canada is an organization that looks to improve the well being of individuals with intellectual disabilities through sport. With over 35 thousand participants across the country, Special Olympics distinguishes itself from other sports organizations by encouraging people of all abilities to participate.

In order to participate in Special Olympics, an individual must be identified by an agency or professional as having an intellectual disability based on three criteria:
  1. Intellectual functioning level (IQ) is below 70-75; 
  2. Significant limitations exist in two or more adaptive skill areas; and 
  3. The condition manifests itself before the age of 18. 
The real benefit of Special Olympics does not come from the competitions it creates but the friendships it helps develop. Whether the athlete is training to compete at the provincial, national and international level or just playing basketball once a week for fun, the social impact for participants is phenomenal. Athletes are provided the opportunity to interact with their peers within the community and foster relationships with coaches, volunteers or referees. These relationships are so important because it can be difficult for people with intellectual disabilities, at times, to find opportunities to interact socially outside of a school or day program setting.

The community created is not just of benefit for the athletes but for their parents as well. Being able to meet other parents who are struggling with many of the same issues can be therapeutic during difficult times. With the public understanding of diagnoses such as autism spectrum disorder and Down syndrome continually growing, parents are able to discuss and share methods that have helped their families and how these have worked for them.

This community that Special Olympics fosters is full of inspirational people. One such example is Susie Doyens, a woman with Down syndrome who was non-verbal for most of her life. She would only speak to her mother and even then, just a few words. However once she started playing golf with Special Olympics, her confidence began to grow. Eventually, she was asked to become a spokesperson for Special Olympics and has done many public speeches to different audiences regarding her experience.

These stories are not uncommon and if you ask almost any parent, sibling or friend of a participant of Special Olympics, you will hear a similar story about how valuable the experience has been for the athlete. Other sport organizations could learn a lot from the Special Olympics on how to encourage community and personal growth, while still providing the opportunity for elite competition. The Special Olympics’ motto is something every athlete should follow: “Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt”.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Chenevert M, Pierce T, Block M, One Shining Moment for One Special Class: Special Olympics Challenge Day in Casper. WY. Palaestra. March 2012;26(2):19-22. 
2. Conatser P, Naugle K, Tillman M, Stopka C. Athletic Trainers’ Beliefs Toward Working With Special Olympics Athletes. Journal Of Athletic Training. May 2009;44(3):279-285. 
3. Doyens S, Adler M, Croslin B. Competing Is The Most Fun Thing I Do. Golf Digest. January 2013;64(1):50. 
4. Harada C, Siperstein G. The Sport Experience of Athletes With Intellectual Disabilities: A National Survey of Special Olympic Athletes and Their Families. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly.January 2009;26(1):68-85. 
5. Krtnick K. The Road less traveled: Division III and Special Olympics partnership paves way to Final Four. NCAA NEWS. April 3, 2013;:2. 
6. Petti S. Special Olympics Canada: enriching lives through sport. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Summer2009 2009;16(2):85-87. 
7. Wilski M, Nadolska A, Dowling S, Mcconkey R, Hassan D. Personal development of participants in special Olympics unified sports teams. Human Movement. October 2012;13(3):271-279.

Olympiques spéciaux : contribution au développement d’une communauté

Olympiques spéciaux - Canada est un organisme qui a pour mission d’améliorer par la pratique du sport le bien-être des personnes présentant une déficience intellectuelle. L’organisme compte plus de 35 000 participants dans tout le Canada; Olympiques spéciaux se démarque des autres organismes sportifs par son ouverture à tous les individus quelle que soit leur aptitude.

Pour participer aux Olympiques spéciaux, une personne doit obtenir l’aval d’une agence ou d’un professionnel confirmant la présence d’une déficience intellectuelle en fonction de trois critères :
  1. Fonctions cognitives (QI) sous la barre des 70-75
  2. Limitations importantes dans deux ou plus de secteurs d’adaptation et 
  3. Déficience manifestée avant l’âge de 18 ans. 
Le bienfait réel des Olympiques spéciaux ne provient pas de la compétition, mais plutôt de l’amitié qui se développe grâce à cet événement. Que l’athlète s’entraîne en vue de compétitions aux niveaux provincial*, national et internationalou qu’il joue par plaisir au basketball une fois par semaine, l’impact social est phénoménal. Les athlètes ont l’occasion d’interagir avec leurs pairs dans la communauté et d’établir une relation avec les entraîneurs, les bénévoles et les officiels. Ces relations sont très importantes, car les personnes présentant une déficience intellectuelle ont parfois de la difficulté à profiter d’occasions pour interagir socialement en dehors de l’école ou du programme de jour.

Cette communauté n’est pas seulement profitable aux athlètes mais aussi aux parents. Rencontrer d’autres parents aux prises avec des problèmes apparentés peut s’avérer thérapeutique en période difficile. La compréhension du public concernant le trouble du spectre de l’autisme et du syndrome de Down ne cesse d’augmenter, ce qui permet aux parents d’échanger entre eux et de partager des méthodes qui leur ont été salutaires et comment ils les ont appliquées. La communauté visée par les Olympiques spéciaux est remplie de personnes inspirantes. Prenons le cas de

Susie Doyens*, une femme présentant le syndrome de Down et qui s’exprimait très peu par la parole. Elle ne s’adressait qu’à sa mère et, même là, en ne disant que quelques mots. Mais lorsqu’elle s’est mise à jouer au golf dans le cadre des Olympiques spéciaux, sa confiance a commencé à se développer. Avec le temps, on lui a demandé d’être la porte-parole des Olympiques spéciaux; depuis, elle s’est adressée en public à différents auditoires pour témoigner de son expérience.

Ces anecdotes sont fréquentes; ainsi, si vous en parlez aux parents, frères et sœurs et camarades d’un participant aux Olympiques spéciaux, vous entendrez des anecdotes similaires témoignant de l’impact positif chez l’athlète ayant participé à ces Jeux. Les autres organismes sportifs pourraient bénéficier grandement de certains aspects des Olympiques spéciaux comme la façon d’impliquer la communauté et de favoriser le développement personnel tout en procurant l’occasion d’ouvrir la porte à la compétition de haut niveau. La devise des Olympiques spéciaux devrait être celui de tous les athlètes : « Que je sois victorieux, mais si je n'y parviens pas, que je sois courageux dans l'effort ».
* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:
 
1. Chenevert M, Pierce T, Block M, One Shining Moment for One Special Class: Special Olympics Challenge Day in Casper. WY. Palaestra. March 2012;26(2):19-22. 
2. Conatser P, Naugle K, Tillman M, Stopka C. Athletic Trainers’ Beliefs Toward Working With Special Olympics Athletes. Journal Of Athletic Training. May 2009;44(3):279-285. 
3. Doyens S, Adler M, Croslin B. Competing Is The Most Fun Thing I Do. Golf Digest. January 2013;64(1):50. 
4. Harada C, Siperstein G. The Sport Experience of Athletes With Intellectual Disabilities: A National Survey of Special Olympic Athletes and Their Families. Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly.January 2009;26(1):68-85. 
5. Krtnick K. The Road less traveled: Division III and Special Olympics partnership paves way to Final Four. NCAA NEWS. April 3, 2013;:2. 
6. Petti S. Special Olympics Canada: enriching lives through sport. Coaches Plan/Plan Du Coach. Summer2009 2009;16(2):85-87. 7. Wilski M, Nadolska A, Dowling S, Mcconkey R, Hassan D. Personal development of participants in special Olympics unified sports teams. Human Movement. October 2012;13(3):271-279.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Can backing a losing team be hazardous for your health?

Fall is the time to be cheering for your favorite football or soccer team, since the regular seasons in both sports are already underway. For die-hard fans whose self-identities are tied to affiliations with certain teams, fall can be synonymous with an emotional rollercoaster. A recent study titled, From Fan to Fat? Vicarious Losing Increases Unhealthy Eating, but Self-Affirmation Is an Effective Remedy, concluded that your eating habits can be effected the day after a game, depending on whether your team wins or loses.

This research looked at fans of the National Football League (NFL) teams and consumption of food on the Monday after a defeat or a win. It concluded that fans on the losing side consumed 16% more saturated fats and 10% more calories. If your team was on the winning side on Sunday, you were likely to consume 9% less saturated fats and 5% fewer calories. Amounts of saturated fat consumption increased if your team was playing an opponent of equal strength, if your team lost by a narrow margin or if your team was defeated unexpectedly. Similarly, soccer fans were more likely to have poor eating habits after a defeat.

Other research has examined fans and rates of cardiac arrest, concluding that cardiac arrest rates increase when your team loses. During the 2006 World Cup of Soccer in Germany, cardiac arrest cases increased when Germany lost a match, when a game was very close or when a game went to the wire. When Germany won or when they played a meaningless match, heart attack rates did not increase.

In football, researchers discovered that it did not make a difference whether you were a male or female fan. However, there tend to be more male than female fans. In the case of soccer, it was concluded that during the 2006 World Cup, cardiac arrest among males tripled, while it doubled in females.

Some options to consider in minimizing health risks while enjoying a game or match
  1. Self affirmation - the process of identifying and focusing on one's most important values. 
  2. Make an effort to consume healthy food during and in the hours and days following the game, regardless of the outcome. 
  3. Switch teams!
Many sports fans invest a great deal of time and money cheering for their teams. The competitive season can be long. A team may have a banner year or may be dismal. However, there are die-hard fans who will cheer for teams whether they are good or utterly terrible, season in and season out. Given the health risks associated with being a sports fan, it might be time to examine our priorities since in truth, there is always the next game or the next year.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. Griffin D, Harris P. Calibrating the Response to Health Warnings: Limiting Both Overreaction and Underreaction With Self-Affirmation. Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.). May 2011;22(5):572-578.
2. Hyatt C. How is loyalty to a professional sports team originally established, and what factors play a role when allegiances are switched: a qualitative examination of the team-switching phenomenon. (Abstract). In 17th Annual North American Society for Sport Management Conference. NASSM abstracts, May 29-June 1, 2002, Canmore, Alberta, Canmore, Alta., North American Society for Sport Management, 2002, p.41--42. Canada: 2002.
3. O'Sullivan T, Hafekost K, Mitrou F, Lawrence D. Food Sources of Saturated Fat and the Association With Mortality: A Meta-Analysis. American Journal Of Public Health. September 2013;103(9):e31-e42.
4. Pollock P. Unhealthy Habits. Black Belt . August 2012;50(8):32.
5. Sweeney D, Quimby D. Exploring the Physical Health Behavior Differences between High and Low Identified Sports Fans. Sport Journal. January 2012;15:1.
6. Vallerand R, Ntoumanis N, Maliha G, et al. On passion and sports fans: A look at football. Journal Of Sports Sciences . October 2008;26(12):1279-1293.

Appuyer une équipe perdante est-il un comportement à risque pour la santé?

À l’automne, la saison régulière bat son plein et c’est la période idéale pour acclamer ses équipes favorites (football, soccer). Pour les mordus qui s’identifient à des équipes précises, l’automne peut s’apparenter à une montagne russe sur le plan émotif. Dans une récente étude intitulée « Du match aux aliments gras : un échec par procuration suscite un apport alimentaire malsain, mais l’affirmation de soi constitue une contremesure efficace »*, les auteurs concluent que les comportements alimentaires peuvent varier le lendemain d’un match, selon le résultat de l’affrontement.

Cette étude analyse les comportements alimentaires des partisans des équipes de la Ligue nationale de football (NFL) le lundi suivant un échec ou une victoire. En conclusion à cette étude, les partisans de l’équipe vaincue consomment 16 % plus de gras saturés et 10 % plus de calories. En revanche, les partisans de l’équipe victorieuse consomment 9 % moins de gras saturés et 5 % moins de calories. L’apport alimentaire en gras saturés augmente si l’équipe favorite affronte un adversaire de même calibre, perd par une mince différence ou perd contre toute attente. Tout autant, les passionnés du soccer adoptent de mauvais comportements alimentaires à la suite d’une défaite.

Dans une autre étude, les auteurs examinent la fréquence des arrêts cardiaqueschez les partisans et concluent que la fréquence augmente avec la défaite de l’équipe favorite. Lors de la Coupe du monde de soccer 2006 en Allemagne, on a enregistré plus de cas d’arrêt cardiaque quand l’Allemagne a perdu, quand le match était très serré ou quand le match s’est rendu à la limite. Quand l’Allemagne a gagné ou a joué un match sans importance, on n’a pas enregistré une augmentation du nombre de cas d’arrêt cardiaque.

Dans le cas du football, les auteurs n’ont pas observé de différences entre les partisans masculins et féminins; toutefois, il y a une tendance en direction des partisans masculins. Durant la Coupe du monde de soccer de 2006, le nombre de cas d’arrêt cardiaque a triplé chez les hommes et doublé chez les femmes.

Voici des conseils pour diminuer les risques pour la santé en regardant un match :
  1. S’affirmer* – processus par lequel on établit ses valeurs les plus importantes et on y adhère 
  2. Consommer des aliments santé durant le match et dans les heures et les jours qui suivent l’affrontement, indépendamment de l’issue du match 
  3. Choisir une autre équipe! 
De nombreux partisans consacrent beaucoup de temps et d’argent pour appuyer leurs équipes. La saison de compétition peut être très longue et une équipe peut fonctionner très bien ou très mal durant toute l’année. Et souvent, les inconditionnels d’une équipe vont l’appuyer en saison et hors-saison, et ce, indépendamment de la performance de l’équipe. Étant donné les risques pour la santéassociés à l’appui d’une équipe, il y a lieu d’analyser ses priorités, car entre vous et moi, il y aura toujours un autre match ou une autre année.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC:

1. Griffin D, Harris P. Calibrating the Response to Health Warnings: Limiting Both Overreaction and Underreaction With Self-Affirmation. Psychological Science (Sage Publications Inc.). May 2011;22(5):572-578.
2. Hyatt C. How is loyalty to a professional sports team originally established, and what factors play a role when allegiances are switched: a qualitative examination of the team-switching phenomenon. (Abstract). In 17th Annual North American Society for Sport Management Conference. NASSM abstracts, May 29-June 1, 2002, Canmore, Alberta, Canmore, Alta., North American Society for Sport Management, 2002, p.41--42. Canada: 2002.
3. O'Sullivan T, Hafekost K, Mitrou F, Lawrence D. Food Sources of Saturated Fat and the Association With Mortality: A Meta-Analysis. American Journal Of Public Health. September 2013;103(9):e31-e42.
4. Pollock P. Unhealthy Habits. Black Belt . August 2012;50(8):32.
5. Sweeney D, Quimby D. Exploring the Physical Health Behavior Differences between High and Low Identified Sports Fans. Sport Journal. January 2012;15:1.
6. Vallerand R, Ntoumanis N, Maliha G, et al. On passion and sports fans: A look at football. Journal Of Sports Sciences . October 2008;26(12):1279-1293.

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

International Walk to School Month

by Trent Weir 
Algonquin College Sport Business Management Intern  

October is International Walk to School Month which celebrates the many benefits of active transportation to school. Schools are encouraged to get involved and help promote active transportation to their students by introducing them to the Active & Safe Routes to School (ASRTS) program.

Active transportation can include any form of travel that is physically engaging (walking, biking, skateboarding etc.). Increasing the number of children who walk or ride to school has many positive impacts not only for the children but for the community as well.

Benefits of using active transportation to school:
  • Health: Switching to active transportation can add up to 45 minutes of mild to vigorous physical activity to a child’s day.
  • Environment: Cutting down on the number of cars driving to school will significantly reduce pollution. 
  • Education: Physically active children have longer attention spans which allows for improved concentration. It has also been shown that middle school students with healthy hearts and lungs scored better in math and reading
  • Community: Participation in programs like a Walking School Bus or simply commuting to school in groups can help bring a community closer together. 
There are also potential financial savings from increasing the number of people using active transportation. In 2010 the Ontario Ministry of Education spent roughly $800 million on busing kids to school. If more children walk or ride to school that spending could be used to improve other areas of our schools.

Some parents may be hesitant to send their children to school by active transportation because of safety concerns. However, an increase in the number of pedestrians has actually been shown to reduce the amount of crime in a neighbourhood. There are also resources, like Elmer the Safety Elephant, to help teach children how to travel safely through their community.

The ASRTS program has many ideas for activities for International Walk to School Month. These resources can be used by parents, teachers and students to help emphasize to their school or community the importance of active transportation. When it comes to the health and well being of children, encouraging them to walk or bike to school is an easy way to increase their physical activity to ensure they meet the recommended daily amount. It can also help them develop the skills to make healthy choices in the future.

References from the SIRC Collection: 
 
1. Børrestrad L, Østergaard L, Andersen L, Bere E. Associations Between Active Commuting to School and Objectively Measured Physical Activity. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. August 2013;10(6):826-832. 
2. Buliung R, Faulkner G, Beesley T, Kennedy J. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation. Journal Of School Health. November 2011;81(11):704-712. 
3. Curriero F, James N, Pollack K, et al. Exploring Walking Path Quality as a Factor for Urban Elementary School Children’s Active Transport to School. Journal Of Physical Activity & Healh. March 2013;10(3):323-334 
4. Eyler A, Baldwin J, Schmid T, et al. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study. American Journal Of Health Education. May 2008;39(3):138-147. 
5. Hinckson E, Hannah M. B. School Travel Plans: Preliminary Evidence for Changing School-Related Travel Patterns in Elementary School Children. American Journal Of Health Promotion. July 2011;25(6):368-371. 
6. Larouche R, Lloyd M, Knight E, Tremblay M. Relationship Between Active School Transport and Body Mass Index in Grades—4-to-6 Children. Pediatric Exercise Science. August 2011;23(3):322-330. 7. Nelson N, Woods C. Neighborhood Perceptions and Active Commuting to School Among Adolescent Boys and Girls. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2010; 7(2): 257-266.

Mois international Marchons vers l’école

by Trent Weir
Algonquin College Sport Business Management Intern 

Octobre est le mois international Marchons vers l’école* ; cet événement célèbre les nombreux bienfaits du transport actif vers l’école. On demande aux écoles de s’impliquer dans le transport actif et de le promouvoir auprès des élèves en leur présentant le programme Sur le chemin de l’école, activement et en toute sécurité (ASRTS).

Le transport actif comprend toute forme active de déplacement (marche, vélo, planche à roulettes, etc.). L’augmentation du nombre d’enfants qui marchent ou se déplacent à vélo vers l’école engendre plusieurs impacts positifs non seulement pour eux, mais aussi pour la communauté.

Bienfaits du transport actif vers l’école:
  • Santé : en incorporant le transport actif, l’enfant ajoute jusqu’à 45 min d’activité physique légère à vigoureuse dans sa journée. 
  • Environnement : en diminuant le nombre d’automobiles se rendant à l’école, on diminue significativement la pollution. 
  • Apprentissage : les enfants physiquement actifs sont attentifs sur une plus longue période, ce qui leur procure une meilleure concentration*. Selon des études, les étudiants d’écoles intermédiaires présentant un meilleur cœur et de meilleurs poumons, ont de meilleurs résultats en mathématiques et en lecture*. 
  • Communauté : la participation à des programmes comme la marche-autobus* ou simplement en se rendant en groupe à l’école a un effet rassembleur dans la communauté.
Il y a aussi des gains à réaliser sur le plan économique en accroissant le nombre de personnes en transport actif. En 2010, le Ministère de l’Éducation de l’Ontario a dépensé environ 800 millions de dollars* dans le transport des enfants vers l’école. Si plus d’enfants se rendaient à pied, à vélo ou à roulettes à l’école, on pourrait utiliser le montant d’argent épargné à l’amélioration d’autres secteurs scolaires.

Quelques parents pourraient avoir des réserves à l’idée du transport actif pour leurs enfants, et ce, pour une question de sécurité. Toutefois, selon une étude, l’accroissement du nombre de piétons est associé à une baisse de la criminalité dans le quartier*. Il existe des ressources, comme Elmer, l’éléphant prudent*, pour enseigner aux enfants comment se déplacer en sécurité dans le quartier.

Le programme ASRTS présente plusieurs activités dans le cadre du Mois international Marchons vers l’école. Ces ressources sont à l’intention des parents, des enseignants et des élèves afin de mettre l’accent, à l’école et dans la communauté, sur l’importance du transport actif. Il faut encourager les enfants à se rendre à pied ou à vélo à l’école, car c’est une bonne façon pour eux d’augmenter leur quantité d’activité physique afin de se conformer aux recommandations journalières. C’est une question de santé et de bien-être pour les enfants. Et, par la même occasion, les enfants peuvent développer des aptitudes leur permettant d’effectuer des choix santé dans l’avenir.

* Seulement disponible en anglais

Références de la collection de SIRC: 

1. Børrestrad L, Østergaard L, Andersen L, Bere E. Associations Between Active Commuting to School and Objectively Measured Physical Activity. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. August 2013;10(6):826-832. 
2. Buliung R, Faulkner G, Beesley T, Kennedy J. School Travel Planning: Mobilizing School and Community Resources to Encourage Active School Transportation. Journal Of School Health. November 2011;81(11):704-712. 
3. Curriero F, James N, Pollack K, et al. Exploring Walking Path Quality as a Factor for Urban Elementary School Children’s Active Transport to School. Journal Of Physical Activity & Healh. March 2013;10(3):323-334 
4. Eyler A, Baldwin J, Schmid T, et al. Parental Involvement in Active Transport to School Initiatives: A Multi-Site Case Study. American Journal Of Health Education. May 2008;39(3):138-147. 
5. Hinckson E, Hannah M. B. School Travel Plans: Preliminary Evidence for Changing School-Related Travel Patterns in Elementary School Children. American Journal Of Health Promotion. July 2011;25(6):368-371. 
6. Larouche R, Lloyd M, Knight E, Tremblay M. Relationship Between Active School Transport and Body Mass Index in Grades—4-to-6 Children. Pediatric Exercise Science. August 2011;23(3):322-330. 7. Nelson N, Woods C. Neighborhood Perceptions and Active Commuting to School Among Adolescent Boys and Girls. Journal Of Physical Activity & Health. March 2010; 7(2): 257-266.