Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Knee Injuries: What to look out for

By Trevor Elder 
Algonquin Sport Business Management student 

When competing in physical activity for young adults, there are some risks that they need to be aware of before participating. A common issue for many athletes is knee injuries; these cannot only lead to short term issues but long lasting problems that will forever be a factor in their level of activity. The knee is a joint that is responsible for a lot of motion and support but it can also be very vulnerable.

The first issue and one of the most serious injuries, is damage to the Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL); this ligament keeps the inside part of the knee stable. Injuries can occur from the knee twisting therefore making it unable to support the weight of the person. The symptoms can include knee pain, locking or catching of the knee, and swelling. The person will experience mild pain that will be in more extreme pain when the leg is straightened. When an injury like this occurs, the person may need surgery to correct the damage as well as a long recovery process.

Patellofemoral pain or runner’s knee is a common issue. Due to the patella’s (knee cap) location, it is typically under more stress than other joints and is usually tender at the lower part of the knee cap. A number of factors can contribute to runner's knee, including:
  • Misalignment of the kneecap 
  • Complete or partial dislocation 
  • Injury 
  • Tightness, imbalance, or weakness of thigh muscles 
  • Flat feet 
A common disorder for young athletes is Osgood Schlatters. This often occurs when athletes are going through a growth spurt and the symptoms can occur for two to three years. Common symptoms are knee pain, swelling and tenderness below the patella.

Treatments* for knee injuries/pain can include anti-inflammatory drugs or wrapping the knee to support it and relieve the pain. If no surgery is required, recovery usually means participation in physiotherapy to get athletes back to the level at which they were competing before the injury.

*When an injury occurs it is important to seek medical attention to receive proper treatment. 

References from the SIRC collection:

1. Anoka, N., Nyland, J., McGinnis, M., Lee, D., Doral, M., & Caborn, D. (2012). Consideration of growth factors and bio-scaffolds for treatment of combined grade II MCL and ACL injury. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 20(5), 878-888. 
2. Kaya, D., Toprak, U., Baltaci, G., Yosmaoglu, B., & Ozer, H. (2013). Long-term functional and sonographic outcomes in Osgood-Schlatter disease. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 21(5), 1131-1139. 
3. Kica, H. (2012). COLLABORATION OF THE COACH AND THE DOCTOR OF SPORTS MEDICINE IN REHABILITATION AND PREVENTION OF INJURY TO THE KNEE-JOINT IN YOUNG BASKETBALL PLAYERS. Activities In Physical Education & Sport, 2(2), 251-253. 
4. Siddiqui, M. A., & Tan, M. H. (2011). Locked knee from superior dislocation of the patella-diagnosis and management of a rare injury. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 19(4), 671-673. 
5. Visnes, H., Aandahl, H., & Bahr, R. (2013). Jumper's knee paradox--jumping ability is a risk factor for developing jumper's knee: a 5-year prospective study. British Journal Of Sports Medicine, 47(8), 503-507.

1 comment:

REBECCA jones said...

It’s truly an informative post about knee injuries. This problem is mostly seen with athletes and have heard that many athletes prefer natural therapies rather than medications. Got to know all this during my back pain treatment at chiropractor in Mississauga clinic. It’s a great therapy.