Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Physical Education Experiences

The Canadian Physical Activity Guidelines recommend that children and youth participate in moderate to vigorous activity for an hour each day. Being active helps children and youth decrease their chances of obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other chronic diseases associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity can help improve academic performance and lead to a healthy life style, which in turn, carries into adulthood.

Physical education classes should be fun for children and youth. They should introduce and develop sport and movement skills among young people, encouraging them to work as a team, while building a love for sport and other life skills that come with socializing and group work. However, this is not always the case. Sometimes, students associate PE classes with negative outcomes.

Research has shown that experiences in PE classes during childhood may impact the extent to which adults follow a healthy lifestyle. Adults who associate PE with positive memories as opposed to negative ones will most likely become physically active in their adult lives. It is important to acknowledge the impact of which positive experiences in PE class can have on children and youth. 
A few things to consider when organizing a PE class include:
  • Offering age appropriate activities, which allow children and youth to learn skills at their level of ability.
  • Determining what resources and support might be available for those less comfortable in the PE environment
  • Developing activities that are inclusive to all participants
  • Evaluating and carefully considering your lesson plan  
Trying to ensure that PE is a positive experience will shape the perceptions of students with respect to physical activity, both during their time as students and as they grow into adults and enter the active for life stage in the LTAD framework. Being physically active brings about many benefits that are not only important in the present but also in the future.

References from the SIRC Collection:

1. BEKIARI A. PERCEPTIONS OF INSTRUCTOR'S VERBAL AGGRESSIVENESS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDENTS' AFFECTIVE LEARNING. Perceptual & Motor Skills. August 2012;115(1):325-335.
2. Bryan C, Solmon M. Student Motivation in Physical Education and Engagement in Physical Activity. Journal Of Sport Behavior. September 2012;35(3):267-285. 
3. Ghofrani M, Golsanamlou M. STUDENTS' PERCEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION COURSES AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH THEIR PARTICIPATION IN SPORT ACTIVITIES. / PERCEPCIJA STUDENATA O NASTAVI TJELESNOG ODGOJA I NJEGOVA POVEZANOST SA NJIHOVIM UČEŠĆEM U SPORTSKIM AKTIVNOSTIMA. Sport Scientific & Practical Aspects. June 2012;9(1):21-31.
4. Patterson D, Collins J. MIDDLE SCHOOL GIRLS' PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES AND TEACHERS. Medicina Sportiva. April 2012;16(1):12-16.
5. Perlman D. An examination of amotivated students within the Sport Education Model. Asia-Pacific Journal Of Health, Sport & Physical Education. August 2012;3(2):141-155.
6. Trout J, Graber K. Perceptions of Overweight Students Concerning Their Experiences in Physical Education. Journal Of Teaching In Physical Education. July 2009;28(3):272-292.

1 comment:

khel Sahitya Kendra said...

Really appreciate this post. It’s hard to sort the good from the bad sometimes, but I think you’ve nailed it!

sports and physical education books